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schmeat

English translation: not a true word

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05:03 Dec 31, 2003
Yiddish to English translations [PRO]
Yiddish term or phrase: schmeat
Related to a quality
Marco Villafan
Local time: 08:14
English translation:not a true word
Explanation:
You will often see the sh- prefix added to a word to express disagreement, disinterest. "So what?" is the implication.
Selected response from:

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 09:14
Grading comment
it seems has to do with my question, but I truly thinks I shpuld be researching again. Thanks
1 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2YidishxxxAlex Zelkind
4 +1not a true word
NancyLynn
4schm- prefixSergio Santoro


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Yidish


Explanation:
In Yidish it means "tough"

xxxAlex Zelkind
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: except it's 'Yiddish'.
37 mins
  -> Yes :) Thank you

agree  Gayle Wallimann: This is cute: tough meat, anyone? blogs.lawrence.com/mathis/entries/195/ - 28k
3 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
not a true word


Explanation:
You will often see the sh- prefix added to a word to express disagreement, disinterest. "So what?" is the implication.

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 09:14
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 1
Grading comment
it seems has to do with my question, but I truly thinks I shpuld be researching again. Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sergio Santoro
11 mins
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
schm- prefix


Explanation:
After reading your note it sounds like something else.
In colloquial American English (and it may very well be a Yiddish influence) you usually repeat a word and replace schm- to the beginning of it when you mean to denigrate what you are talking about, or better, what someone else is talking about:

"I don't know, I've never understood much of this hindu-schmindu stuff..."

it's usually made with words of one or two syllables, and your "cheated schmeated" seems to be that case. In this case, it doesn't seem to be denigration, but more like they want to emphasize the act of cheating.

Sergio Santoro
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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