Member since Feb '14

Working languages:
Spanish to English
English to Spanish

Susie Rawson
Words and beyond

Brooklyn, New York, United States

Native in: Spanish (Variant: Latin American) Native in Spanish
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Account type Freelance translator and/or interpreter, Identity Verified Verified member
Data security Created by Evelio Clavel-Rosales This person has a SecurePRO™ card. Because this person is not a ProZ.com Plus subscriber, to view his or her SecurePRO™ card you must be a ProZ.com Business member or Plus subscriber.
Services Translation, Editing/proofreading
Expertise
Specializes in:
Cooking / CulinaryFood & Drink
Tourism & TravelWine / Oenology / Viticulture
Education / PedagogyMarketing / Market Research
Advertising / Public RelationsGeneral / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
JournalismMathematics & Statistics
KudoZ activity (PRO) PRO-level points: 129, Questions answered: 138, Questions asked: 119
Payment methods accepted PayPal, Check, Wire transfer
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Portfolio Sample translations submitted: 7
Experience Years of translation experience: 22. Registered at ProZ.com: Jan 2014. Became a member: Feb 2014.
Credentials English (University of Cambridge, verified)
Spanish (University of Cambridge, verified)
Spanish to English (ProZ Certification)
Memberships N/A
Software Adobe Acrobat, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Office Pro, Microsoft Word, Powerpoint, SDL TRADOS
Website http://www.rawson-translations.com
Training sessions attended Trainings
Professional practices Susie Rawson endorses ProZ.com's Professional Guidelines (v1.1).
Bio
I like to call myself a gourmet translator. Have always worked in bilingual environments and live six months out of the year in Brooklyn, New York. I am equally fluent in Spanish and English. Married to a professional chef, so the language of food&wine is always in the air.
TO BROIL OR NOT TO BROIL. THAT IS THE QUESTION.
When broiling is required, you and I know exactly what that calls for. But not everyone does. If you care to look it up in a regular English-Spanish dictionary, you are likely to find “asar” as a translation, which actually means bake or roast, but no indication is given about cooking directly under the heat source. And the reason is that in many Latin American countries, stoves don´t have broilers. Therefore, it really takes a translator well trained in the culinary arts to be able to translate this correctly, since different words may be required according to context.
Believe it or not, this area has its own technical terminology, and it takes someone who really loves food to properly understand the procedures and therefore be able to put them into a different language, for a different culture.
I firmly believe that culinary texts need to be translated by people with knowledge of the cuisine in both source and target languages. Language alone is far from enough in this field, since quite often an ingredient or even a utensil might not have an equivalent in the target language, and that’s when the food-lover expertise becomes of vital importance. Not only is it necessary that the instructions of a recipe are easy to understand and follow, the a recipe also needs to make sense and sound attractive.
THE LANGUAGE OF WINE
Unless you are immersed in the wonderful world of the wine and its art, how can you possibly understand the vocabulary involved in the description of aromas, flavors and other subtle delicacies, let alone translate them into a different language?
Keywords: food, recipes, wine, cookbook, ingredients, travel, tourism


Profile last updated
Jun 6, 2018



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