Working languages:
English to Russian
Russian to English

Anna Shastak
Passionate and experienced translator

Haywards Heath , United Kingdom
Local time: 00:46 BST (GMT+1)

Native in: Russian Native in Russian
  • PayPal accepted
  • Send message through ProZ.com
Feedback from
clients and colleagues

on Willingness to Work Again info
No feedback collected
Account type Freelance translator and/or interpreter
Data security Created by Evelio Clavel-Rosales This person has a SecurePRO™ card. Because this person is not a ProZ.com Plus subscriber, to view his or her SecurePRO™ card you must be a ProZ.com Business member or Plus subscriber.
Affiliations This person is not affiliated with any business or Blue Board record at ProZ.com.
Services Translation, Language instruction, Subtitling
Expertise
Specializes in:
Cooking / CulinaryPoetry & Literature
Linguistics
Rates
English to Russian - Standard rate: 0.10 GBP per word / 25 GBP per hour / 0.40 GBP per audio/video minute
Russian to English - Standard rate: 0.10 GBP per word / 25 GBP per hour / 0.40 GBP per audio/video minute
Portfolio Sample translations submitted: 1
English to Russian: The ones who walk away from Omelas
General field: Art/Literary
Detailed field: Poetry & Literature
Source text - English
The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas From The Wind's Twelve Quarters: Short Stories by Ursula Le Guin With a clamor of bells that set the swallows soaring, the Festival of Summer came to the city Omelas, bright-towered by the sea. The rigging of the boats in harbor sparkled with flags. In the streets between houses with red roofs and painted walls, between old moss-grown gardens and under avenues of trees, past great parks and public buildings, processions moved. Some were decorous: old people in long stiff robes of mauve and grey, grave master workmen, quiet, merry women carrying their babies and chatting as they walked. In other streets the music beat faster, a shimmering of gong and tambourine, and the people went dancing, the procession was a dance. Children dodged in and out, their high calls rising like the swallows' crossing flights, over the music and the singing. All the processions wound towards the north side of the city, where on the great water-meadow called the Green' Fields boys and girls, naked in the bright air, with mudstained feet and ankles and long, lithe arms, exercised their restive horses before the race. The horses wore no gear at all but a halter without bit. Their manes were braided with streamers of silver, gold, and green. They flared their nostrils and pranced and boasted to one another; they were vastly excited, the horse being the only animal who has adopted our ceremonies as his own. Far off to the north and west the mountains stood up half encircling Omelas on her bay. The air of morning was so clear that the snow still crowning the Eighteen Peaks burned with white-gold fire across the miles of sunlit air, under the dark blue of the sky. There was just enough wind to make the banners that marked the racecourse snap and flutter now and then. In the silence of the broad green meadows one could hear the music winding through the city streets, farther and nearer and ever approaching, a cheerful faint sweetness of the air that from time to time trembled and gathered together and broke out into the great joyous clanging of the bells.
Joyous! How is one to tell about joy? How describe the citizens of Omelas? They were not simple folk, you see, though they were happy. But we do not say the words of cheer much any more. All smiles have become archaic. Given a description such as this one tends to make certain assumptions. Given a description such as this one tends to look next for the King, mounted on a splendid stallion and surrounded by his noble knights, or perhaps in a golden litter borne by great-muscled slaves. But there was no king. They did not use swords, or keep slaves. They were not barbarians. I do not know the rules and laws of their society, but I suspect that they were singularly few. As they did without monarchy and slavery, so they also got on without the stock exchange, the advertisement, the secret police, and the bomb. Yet I repeat that these were not simple folk, not dulcet shepherds, noble savages, bland utopians. They were not less complex than us. The trouble is that we have a bad habit, encouraged by pedants and sophisticates, of considering happiness as something rather stupid. Only pain is intellectual, only evil interesting. This is the treason of the artist: a refusal to admit the banality of evil and the terrible boredom of pain. If you can't lick 'em, join 'em. If it hurts, repeat it. But to praise despair is to condemn delight, to embrace violence is to lose hold of everything else. We have almost lost hold; we can no longer describe a happy man, nor make any celebration of joy. How can I tell you about the people of Omelas? They were not naive and happy children – though their children were, in fact, happy. They were mature, intelligent, passionate adults whose lives were not wretched. O miracle! but I wish I could describe it better. I wish I could convince you.
Omelas sounds in my words like a city in a fairy tale, long ago and far away, once upon a time. Perhaps it would be best if you imagined it as your own fancy bids, assuming it will rise to the occasion, for certainly I cannot suit you all. For instance, how about technology? I think that there would be no cars or helicopters in and above the streets; this follows from the fact that the people of Omelas are happy people. Happiness is based on a just discrimination of what is necessary, what is neither necessary nor destructive, and what is destructive. In the middle category, however – that of the unnecessary but undestructive, that of comfort, luxury, exuberance, etc. -- they could perfectly well have central heating, subway trains,. washing machines, and all kinds of marvelous devices not yet invented here, floating light-sources, fuelless power, a cure for the common cold. Or they could have none of that: it doesn't matter. As you like it. I incline to think that people from towns up and down the coast have been coming in to Omelas during the last days before the Festival on very fast little trains and double-decked trams, and that the train station of Omelas is actually the handsomest building in town, though plainer than the magnificent Farmers' Market. But even granted trains, I fear that Omelas so far strikes some of you as goody-goody. Smiles, bells, parades, horses, bleh. If so, please add an orgy. If an orgy would help, don't hesitate. Let us not, however, have temples from which issue beautiful nude priests and priestesses already half in ecstasy and ready to copulate with any man or woman, lover or stranger who desires union with the deep godhead of the blood, although that was my first idea. But really it would be better not to have any temples in Omelas – at least, not manned temples. Religion yes, clergy no. Surely the beautiful nudes can just wander about, offering themselves like divine souffles to the hunger of the needy and the rapture of the flesh. Let them join the processions. Let tambourines be struck above the copulations, and the glory of desire be proclaimed upon the gongs, and (a not unimportant point) let the offspring of these delightful rituals be beloved and looked after by all. One thing I know there is none of in Omelas is guilt. But what else should there be? I thought at first there were no drugs, but that is puritanical. For those who like it, the faint insistent sweetness of drooz may perfume the ways of the city, drooz which first brings a great lightness and brilliance to the mind and limbs, and then after some hours a dreamy languor, and wonderful visions at last of the very arcana and inmost secrets of the Universe, as well as exciting the pleasure of sex beyond all belief; and it is not habit-forming. For more modest tastes I think there ought to be beer. What else, what else belongs in the joyous city? The sense of victory, surely, the celebration of courage. But as we did without clergy, let us do without soldiers. The joy built upon successful slaughter is not the right kind of joy; it will not do; it is fearful and it is trivial. A boundless and generous contentment, a magnanimous triumph felt not against some outer enemy but in communion with the finest and fairest in the souls of all men everywhere and the splendor of the world's summer; this is what swells the hearts of the people of Omelas, and the victory they celebrate is that of life. I really don't think many of them need to take drooz. Most of the processions have reached the Green Fields by now. A marvelous smell of cooking goes forth from the red and blue tents of the provisioners. The faces of small children are amiably sticky; in the benign grey beard of a man a couple of crumbs of rich pastry are entangled. The youths and girls have mounted their horses and are beginning to group around the starting line of the course. An old woman, small, fat, and laughing, is passing out flowers from a basket, and tall young men, wear her flowers in their shining hair. A child of nine or ten sits at the edge of the crowd, alone, playing on a wooden flute. People pause to listen, and they smile, but they do not speak to him, for he never ceases playing and never sees them, his dark eyes wholly rapt in the sweet, thin magic of the tune.
He finishes, and slowly lowers his hands holding the wooden flute. As if that little private silence were the signal, all at once a trumpet sounds from the pavilion near the starting line: imperious, melancholy, piercing. The horses rear on their slender legs, and some of them neigh in answer. Sober-faced, the young riders stroke the horses' necks and soothe them, whispering, "Quiet, quiet, there my beauty, my hope. . . ." They begin to form in rank along the starting line. The crowds along the racecourse are like a field of grass and flowers in the wind. The Festival of Summer has begun. Do you believe? Do you accept the festival, the city, the joy? No? Then let me describe one more thing. In a basement under one of the beautiful public buildings of Omelas, or perhaps in the cellar of one of its spacious private homes, there is a room. It has one locked door, and no window. A little light seeps in dustily between cracks in the boards, secondhand from a cobwebbed window somewhere across the cellar. In one corner of the little room a couple of mops, with stiff, clotted, foul-smelling heads, stand near a rusty bucket. The floor is dirt, a little damp to the touch, as cellar dirt usually is. The room is about three paces long and two wide: a mere broom closet or disused tool room. In the room a child is sitting. It could be a boy or a girl. It looks about six, but actually is nearly ten. It is feeble-minded. Perhaps it was born defective or perhaps it has become imbecile through fear, malnutrition, and neglect. It picks its nose and occasionally fumbles vaguely with its toes or genitals, as it sits haunched in the corner farthest from the bucket and the two mops. It is afraid of the mops. It finds them horrible. It shuts its eyes, but it knows the mops are still standing there; and the door is locked; and nobody will come. The door is always locked; and nobody ever comes, except that sometimes-the child has no understanding of time or interval – sometimes the door rattles terribly and opens, and a person, or several people, are there. One of them may come and kick the child to make it stand up. The others never come close, but peer in at it with frightened, disgusted eyes. The food bowl and the water jug are hastily filled, the door is locked, the eyes disappear. The people at the door never say anything, but the child, who has not always lived in the tool room, and can remember sunlight and its mother's voice, sometimes speaks. "I will be good," it says. "Please let me out. I will be good!" They never answer. The child used to scream for help at night, and cry a good deal, but now it only makes a kind of whining, "eh-haa, eh-haa," and it speaks less and less often. It is so thin there are no calves to its legs; its belly protrudes; it lives on a half-bowl of corn meal and grease a day. It is naked. Its buttocks and thighs are a mass of festered sores, as it sits in its own excrement continually. They all know it is there, all the people of Omelas. Some of them have come to see it, others are content merely to know it is there. They all know that it has to be there. Some of them understand why, and some do not, but they all understand that their happiness, the beauty of their city, the tenderness of their friendships, the health of their children, the wisdom of their scholars, the skill of their makers, even the abundance of their harvest and the kindly weathers of their skies, depend wholly on this child's abominable misery. This is usually explained to children when they are between eight and twelve, whenever they seem capable of understanding; and most of those who come to see the child are young people, though often enough an adult comes, or comes back, to see the child. He finishes, and slowly lowers his hands holding the wooden flute. As if that little private silence were the signal, all at once a trumpet sounds from the pavilion near the starting line: imperious, melancholy, piercing. The horses rear on their slender legs, and some of them neigh in answer. Sober-faced, the young riders stroke the horses' necks and soothe them, whispering, "Quiet, quiet, there my beauty, my hope. . . ." They begin to form in rank along the starting line. The crowds along the racecourse are like a field of grass and flowers in the wind. The Festival of Summer has begun. Do you believe? Do you accept the festival, the city, the joy? No? Then let me describe one more thing. In a basement under one of the beautiful public buildings of Omelas, or perhaps in the cellar of one of its spacious private homes, there is a room. It has one locked door, and no window. A little light seeps in dustily between cracks in the boards, secondhand from a cobwebbed window somewhere across the cellar. In one corner of the little room a couple of mops, with stiff, clotted, foul-smelling heads, stand near a rusty bucket. The floor is dirt, a little damp to the touch, as cellar dirt usually is. The room is about three paces long and two wide: a mere broom closet or disused tool room. In the room a child is sitting. It could be a boy or a girl. It looks about six, but actually is nearly ten. It is feeble-minded. Perhaps it was born defective or perhaps it has become imbecile through fear, malnutrition, and neglect. It picks its nose and occasionally fumbles vaguely with its toes or genitals, as it sits haunched in the corner farthest from the bucket and the two mops. It is afraid of the mops. It finds them horrible. It shuts its eyes, but it knows the mops are still standing there; and the door is locked; and nobody will come. The door is always locked; and nobody ever comes, except that sometimes-the child has no understanding of time or interval – sometimes the door rattles terribly and opens, and a person, or several people, are there. One of them may come and kick the child to make it stand up. The others never come close, but peer in at it with frightened, disgusted eyes. The food bowl and the water jug are hastily filled, the door is locked, the eyes disappear. The people at the door never say anything, but the child, who has not always lived in the tool room, and can remember sunlight and its mother's voice, sometimes speaks. "I will be good," it says. "Please let me out. I will be good!" They never answer. The child used to scream for help at night, and cry a good deal, but now it only makes a kind of whining, "eh-haa, eh-haa," and it speaks less and less often. It is so thin there are no calves to its legs; its belly protrudes; it lives on a half-bowl of corn meal and grease a day. It is naked. Its buttocks and thighs are a mass of festered sores, as it sits in its own excrement continually. They all know it is there, all the people of Omelas. Some of them have come to see it, others are content merely to know it is there. They all know that it has to be there. Some of them understand why, and some do not, but they all understand that their happiness, the beauty of their city, the tenderness of their friendships, the health of their children, the wisdom of their scholars, the skill of their makers, even the abundance of their harvest and the kindly weathers of their skies, depend wholly on this child's abominable misery. This is usually explained to children when they are between eight and twelve, whenever they seem capable of understanding; and most of those who come to see the child are young people, though often enough an adult comes, or comes back, to see the child. He finishes, and slowly lowers his hands holding the wooden flute. As if that little private silence were the signal, all at once a trumpet sounds from the pavilion near the starting line: imperious, melancholy, piercing. The horses rear on their slender legs, and some of them neigh in answer. Sober-faced, the young riders stroke the horses' necks and soothe them, whispering, "Quiet, quiet, there my beauty, my hope. . . ." They begin to form in rank along the starting line. The crowds along the racecourse are like a field of grass and flowers in the wind. The Festival of Summer has begun. Do you believe? Do you accept the festival, the city, the joy? No? Then let me describe one more thing. In a basement under one of the beautiful public buildings of Omelas, or perhaps in the cellar of one of its spacious private homes, there is a room. It has one locked door, and no window. A little light seeps in dustily between cracks in the boards, secondhand from a cobwebbed window somewhere across the cellar. In one corner of the little room a couple of mops, with stiff, clotted, foul-smelling heads, stand near a rusty bucket. The floor is dirt, a little damp to the touch, as cellar dirt usually is. The room is about three paces long and two wide: a mere broom closet or disused tool room. In the room a child is sitting. It could be a boy or a girl. It looks about six, but actually is nearly ten. It is feeble-minded. Perhaps it was born defective or perhaps it has become imbecile through fear, malnutrition, and neglect. It picks its nose and occasionally fumbles vaguely with its toes or genitals, as it sits haunched in the corner farthest from the bucket and the two mops. It is afraid of the mops. It finds them horrible. It shuts its eyes, but it knows the mops are still standing there; and the door is locked; and nobody will come. The door is always locked; and nobody ever comes, except that sometimes-the child has no understanding of time or interval – sometimes the door rattles terribly and opens, and a person, or several people, are there. One of them may come and kick the child to make it stand up. The others never come close, but peer in at it with frightened, disgusted eyes. The food bowl and the water jug are hastily filled, the door is locked, the eyes disappear. The people at the door never say anything, but the child, who has not always lived in the tool room, and can remember sunlight and its mother's voice, sometimes speaks. "I will be good," it says. "Please let me out. I will be good!" They never answer. The child used to scream for help at night, and cry a good deal, but now it only makes a kind of whining, "eh-haa, eh-haa," and it speaks less and less often. It is so thin there are no calves to its legs; its belly protrudes; it lives on a half-bowl of corn meal and grease a day. It is naked. Its buttocks and thighs are a mass of festered sores, as it sits in its own excrement continually. They all know it is there, all the people of Omelas. Some of them have come to see it, others are content merely to know it is there. They all know that it has to be there. Some of them understand why, and some do not, but they all understand that their happiness, the beauty of their city, the tenderness of their friendships, the health of their children, the wisdom of their scholars, the skill of their makers, even the abundance of their harvest and the kindly weathers of their skies, depend wholly on this child's abominable misery. This is usually explained to children when they are between eight and twelve, whenever they seem capable of understanding; and most of those who come to see the child are young people, though often enough an adult comes, or comes back, to see the child. No matter how well the matter has been explained to them, these young spectators are always shocked and sickened at the sight. They feel disgust, which they had thought themselves superior to. They feel anger, outrage, impotence, despite all the explanations. They would like to do something for the child. But there is nothing they can do. If the child were brought up into the sunlight out of that vile place, if it were cleaned and fed and comforted, that would be a good thing, indeed; but if it were done, in that day and hour all the prosperity and beauty and delight of Omelas would wither and be destroyed. Those are the terms. To exchange all the goodness and grace of every life in Omelas for that single, small improvement: to throw away the happiness of thousands for the chance of the happiness of one: that would be to let guilt within the walls indeed. The terms are strict and absolute; there may not even be a kind word spoken to the child. Often the young people go home in tears, or in a tearless rage, when they have seen the child and faced this terrible paradox. They may brood over it for weeks or years. But as time goes on they begin to realize that even if the child could be released, it would not get much good of its freedom: a little vague pleasure of warmth and food, no doubt, but little more. It is too degraded and imbecile to know any real joy. It has been afraid too long ever to be free of fear. Its habits are too uncouth for it to respond to humane treatment. Indeed, after so long it would probably be wretched without walls about it to protect it, and darkness for its eyes, and its own excrement to sit in. Their tears at the bitter injustice dry when they begin to perceive the terrible justice of reality, and to accept it. Yet it is their tears and anger, the trying of their generosity and the acceptance of their helplessness, which are perhaps the true source of the splendor of their lives. Theirs is no vapid, irresponsible happiness. They know that they, like the child, are not free. They know compassion. It is the existence of the child, and their knowledge of its existence, that makes possible the nobility of their architecture, the poignancy of their music, the profundity of their science. It is because of the child that they are so gentle with children. They know that if the wretched one were not there snivelling in the dark, the other one, the flute-player, could make no joyful music as the young riders line up in their beauty for the race in the sunlight of the first morning of summer. Now do you believe in them? Are they not more credible? But there is one more thing to tell, and this is quite incredible. At times one of the adolescent girls or boys who go to see the child does not go home to weep or rage, does not, in fact, go home at all. Sometimes also a man or woman much older falls silent for a day or two, and then leaves home. These people go out into the street, and walk down the street alone. They keep walking, and walk straight out of the city of Omelas, through the beautiful gates. They keep walking across the farmlands of Omelas. Each one goes alone, youth or girl man or woman. Night falls; the traveler must pass down village streets, between the houses with yellow-lit windows, and on out into the darkness of the fields. Each alone, they go west or north, towards the mountains. They go on. They leave Omelas, they walk ahead into the darkness, and they do not come back. The place they go towards is a place even less imaginable to most of us than the city of happiness. I cannot describe it at all. It is possible that it does not exist. But they seem to know where they are going, the ones who walk away from Omelas.
Translation - Russian
Те, кто уходит из Омеласа
From The Wind's Twelve Quarters: Short Stories
by Ursula Le Guin
Звоном колоколов, спугнувших ласточек, Летний фестиваль пришёл в город Омелас, сверкавший башнями у моря. Корабли в порту пестрели флагами. По улицам, между домами с красными крышами и выкрашенными стенами, между поросшими мхом садами и по аллеям, мимо прекрасных парков и зданий, двигались шествия. Некоторые были нарядными: старики в лиловых и серых крахмальных мантиях, серьёзные рабочие, радостные женщины, несущие детей и болтающие на ходу. На других улицах музыка была быстрее, переливы гонга и тамбурина, и люди танцевали, вся процессия превращалась в танец. Дети сновали тут и там, их высокие голоса поднимались в небо как ласточки, над музыкой и песнями. Все процессии стекались к северной части города, где на большом лугу, носившем название Зелёные поля, мальчики и девочки, нагие в прозрачном воздухе, с ногами, забрызганными грязью, и длинными, грациозными руками, разогревали лошадей перед гонкой. Кроме простого повода без удила на лошадях больше ничего не было. В их гривы были вплетены серебрянные, золотые и зелёные ленты. Они раздували ноздри, становились на дыбы и рисовались друг перед другом; они были на взводе, лошади —— единственные животные, принявшие наши церемонии как свои собственные. Вдалеке на севере и западе горы окружали Омелас в его заливе. Утренний воздух был таким прозрачным, что снег, все еще венчавший Восемнадцать пиков, горел бело-золотым огнём сквозь мили напоенного солнцем воздуха, под темной синевой неба. Ветра хватало как раз на то, чтобы флаги, отмечавшие беговые дорожки, время от времени на нем трепетали. В тишине лугов можно было услышать музыку, льющуюся по улицам города, дальше и ближе, постоянное приближаясь, слабая радостная сладость воздуха, которая время от времени дрожала, собиралась вместе и разражалась счастливым звоном колоколов.
Счастливым! Как можно рассказать о счастье? Как рассказать о жителях Омеласа?
Они не были простаками, понимаете, хоть и были счастливы. Но мы не часто сейчас говорим о радости. Улыбки устарели. Описание вроде этого наталкивает на определенные предположения. Описание вроде этого заставляет искать короля, верхом на прекрасной лошади и в окружении благородных рыцарей, или в золотом паланкине на плечах у мускулистых рабов. Но там не было короля. Они не дрались на мечах и не владели рабами. Они не были варварами. Я не знаю законов и правил их общества, но я подозреваю, что их было немного. Поскольку они обходились без монархии и рабства, они обходились и без валютной биржи, рекламы, секретной полиции и ядерной бомбы. Но я все же повторю, что они не были ни простаками, ни добрыми пастухами, ни благородными дикарями, ни кроткими жителями утопии. Они были не проще, чем мы с вами. Проблема в том, что у нас есть плохая привычка, поддерживаемся педантами и мудрецами, считать счастье чем-то глупым. Только боль умна, только зло интересно. Это предательство художника: отказ признать банальность зла и ужасную скуку боли. Если не можешь их превзойти, примкни. Если больно, повтори. Но прославляя отчаяние мы осуждаем радость, принимая жестокость мы упускаем все остальное. Мы почти все упустили; мы больше не можем ни описать счастливого человека, ни устроить праздник радости. Как я могу рассказать вам о людях Омеласа? Они не были наивными и счастливыми детьми — хотя дети их были, на самом деле, счастливыми. Они были зрелыми, умными, страстными взрослыми, чьи жизни не были покалечены. Какое чудо! Если бы я могла рассказать об этом лучше. Если бы я могла вас убедить.

В моей истории Омелас выглядит городом из сказки, существовавшим давным давно и далеко-далеко, много лет тому назад. Наверное, будет лучше, если вы представите себе его так, как требует того ваша фантазия, думаю, она не подведёт, потому что я не могу угодить всем. Например, как там с технологиями? Думаю, там не будет машин или вертолетов на улицах и над ними; это исходит из того, что жители Омеласа -- счастливые люди. Счастье основывается на справедливом различии между тем, что необходимо, что не является ни необходимым, ни разрушительным, и что является разрушительным. В средней категории, тем не менее, той, что не является необходимой, но никому не вреди, той, где роскошь и шик, могли бы быть центральное отопление, метро, стиральные машины и все возможные устройства, еще не придуманные в нашем мире, парящие источники света, энергия, получаемая без топлива, лекарство от обычной простуды. Или у них ничего этого нет. Это не важно. Как вам угодно. Я склонна думать, что люди из прибрежных городов ехали в Омелас в течение нескольких дней перед фестивалем на быстрых маленьких поездах и двухэтажных трамваях, и что железнодорожный вокзал в Омеласе — самое красиво здание в городе, пусть и проще, чем великолепный фермерский рынок. Но даже с поездами я все еще опасаюсь, что некоторым из вас жители Омеласа кажутся святошами. Улыбки, колокола, парады, лошади, фу, какая гадость. Если это так, пожалуйста, добавьте оргию. Если оргия поможет, то не мешкайте. Но давайте не будем представлять храмы, из которых выходят красивые обнаженные жрецы и жрицы, в полуэкстазе и готовые совокупляться с любыми мужчинами и женщинами, любовниками и незнакомцами, которые хотят единения с родовитыми божествами, хоть это и было первым, что пришло мне в голову. Но на самом деле было бы лучше, если бы в Омеласе не было никаких храмов -- по крайней мере таких, где есть люди. Религия -- пожалуйста, но без духовенства. Конечно, обнаженные красавицы и красавцы могут просто блуждать, предлагая себя как чудесные суфле голоду нуждающихся и экстазу плоти. Пусть они присоединяться к шествиям. Пусть тамбурины звенят над соитием, и красота желания будет обвещена под звуки гонгов, и (это важный момент) пусть отпрыски этих великолепных ритуалов будут любимы всеми и находят заботу у всех. Одно, в чем я уверена, так это в том, что в Омеласе нет вины. Но что еще там должно быть? Сначала я подумала, что там не было наркотиков, но это пуританство. Для тех, кому это нравится, слабая настойчивая сладость друзаокутывает город, друз, что сначала приносит легкость и ясность ума и движений, а спустя несколько часов -- мечтательную усталость, и, наконец, прекрасные видения самых сокровенных секретов Вселенной, и невероятное наслаждение сексом; и он не вызывает привыкания. На более скромный вкус, думаю, там должно быть пиво. Что же еще должно быть в счастливом городе? Чувство победы, конечно же, празднование храбрости. Но как мы обошлись без духовенства, давайте обойдёмся и без армии. Радость, происходящая из победной резни -- неправильная, она здесь неуместна. Она пугающа и тривиальна. Безграничное и щедрое довольство,благородный триумф ощущался не вопреки внешнему врагу, но в единении с лучшими из лучших и великолепием лета. Вот что наполняет сердца жителей Омеласа, и победа, празднуемая ими, это победа жизни. I really don't think many of them need to take drooz.
Большинство шествий уже дошли до Зелёных лугов. Пьянящие ароматы готовящейся еды поднимаются над красными и синими палатками поваров. Лица детей дружелюбны и нетерпеливы. В благородной седой бороде мужчины застряли крошки сдобы. Юноши и девушки оседлали лошадей и начинают собираться у линии старта. Старушка, маленькая, пухленькая, с улыбкой раздаёт цветы из корзины, а высокие молодые люди украшают ими свои блестящие волосы. Ребёнок девяти или десяти лет сидит на краю людского моря, один, играет на деревянной флейте. Люди останавливаются послушать, и они улыбаются, но не говорят с ним, потому что он никогда не прекращает играть и никогда их не видит, его темные глаза полностью поглощены сладкой и тонкой магией мелодии.

Он перестаёт играть и медленно опускает руки с флейтой.
Как будто эта маленькая личная тишина была сигналом, сразу же раздаётся звук тромбона у линии старта: властный, меланхоличный, пронзительный. Лошади взвиваются на дыбы и некоторые из них ржут в ответ. Молодые наездники со здравыми лицами гладят лошадиные шеи и успокаивают их, шепча: "Тише, тише, мой красавец, моя надежда ... " Они выстраиваются в линию вдоль линии старта. Толпы вдоль ипподрома как поля трав и цветов на ветру. Фестиваль лета начался.
Вы верите? Принимаете ли фестиваль, город, радость? Нет? Тогда позвольте мне описать кое-что еще.
В подвале под одним из административных зданий Омеласа, или может в погребе одного из просторных частных домой, есть комната. В ней есть запертая дверь и нет окна. Пыльный свет сочится в неё через зазоры между досками, из затянутого паутиной окна где-то в другом конце подвала. В углу этой комнаты стоит несколько швабр с задубевшими, грязными, дурно пахнущими тряпками, рядом с ржавым ведром. Пол земляной, сырой наощупь, как всегда в погребе. Комната примерно три шага в длину и два — в ширину: всего лишь закуток для швабр или заброшенная коморка. В комнате сидит ребёнок. Это может быть мальчик или девочка. Выглядит на 6, но на самом деле ему или ей почти 10. Ребёнок слабоумен. Возможно, он таким родился, или, может, стал таким из-за страха, голода и запущенности. Он ковыряется в носу и иногда теребит пальцы ног или гениталии, сидя скрючившись в углу, дальнем от ведра и швабр. Он боится швабр. Они кажутся ему ужасными. Он закрывает глаза, но знает, что они все еще там; и что дверь закрыта; и что никто не придёт. Дверь всегда закрыта; и никто никогда не приходит, кроме как иногда -- у ребёнка нет чувства времени -- иногда дверь ужасно гремит и открывается, и за ней стоит человек или несколько. Кто-то может войти и пнуть ребёнка, чтобы он встал. Другие никогда не подходят близко, но смотрят на него глазами полными ужаса и отвращения. Миска с едой и кувшин с водой быстро наполняются, дверь закрывается, глаза исчезают. Люди у двери никогда ничего не говорят, но ребёнок, которые не всегда жил в этом подвале и помнит солнечный свет и голос матери, иногда говорит. "Я буду хорошим", -- говорит он. "Пожалуйста, выпустите меня. Я буду хорошим!" Они никогда не отвечают. Раньше ребёнок звал на помощь по ночам, и много плакал, но сейчас все звуки, что от него можно услышать, похожи лишь на слабый стон, и он говорит все реже и реже. Он так худ, что у него нет икр, живот выпирает; все, что он ест -- полмиски кукурузной каши с жиром в день. Он гол. Его ягодицы и бёдра все в нарывах от того, что он постоянно сидит в своих экскрементах.
Все знают, что он там, все люди Омеласа. Одни приходили на него посмотреть, другим достаточно просто знать, что он там. Все знают, что он должен там быть. Кто-то понимает, почему, кто-то нет, но все понимают, что их счастье, красота города, нежность дружбы, здоровье детей, мудрость ученых, умения мастеров, даже обилие урожая и хорошая погода, все зависит от ужасающих страданий ребёнка.
Обычно это объясняют детям в возрасте 8-12 лет, тогда, когда они уже способны понимать; большинство из тех, кто приходит посмотреть на ребёнка -- молодые люди, но иногда и взрослые приходят, или возвращаются, посмотреть на ребёнка. Неважно, насколько хорошо

Им все объяснили, увиденное шокирует их. Они чувствуют отвращение, на которое считали себя неспособными. Они чувствуют злость, ярость, бессилие, несмотря на все объяснения. Они бы хотели сделать что-нибудь для ребёнка. Но они ничего не могут. Если бы ребёнка вывели на солнечный свет из этого зловонного подвала, если бы его вымыли, накормили и успокоили, это было бы на самом деле хорошо; но если бы это произошло, в тот же день и час все благосостояние, красота и счастье Омеласа завяли бы и были разрушены. Таковы условия. Обменять все счастье и радость каждой жизни в Омеласе на это единственное небольшое улучшение: пустить по ветру счастье тысяч ради шанса сделать счастливым одного: это бы точно впустило в город вину.
Условия строги и не обсуждаются; ребёнок не должен услышать ни одного доброго слова.
Часто молодые люди возвращаются домой в слезах или в тихой ярости, увидев ребёнка и столкнувшись с этим ужасным парадоксом. Они могут думать об этом неделями или годами. Но со временем они начинают понимать, что даже если бы ребёнка выпустили, он бы не много получил от свободы: слабое удовольствие от тепла и еды, конечно же, но вряд ли больше. Он слишком отстал и слабоумен, чтобы ощущать настоящую радость. Он слишком долго боялся, чтобы хоть когда-нибудь освободиться от страха. Его привычки слишком варварски, чтобы он мог отвечать на гуманное отношение. Наверняка спустя все это время он будет несчастен без стен, которые его защитят, и темноты, и собственных экскрементов. Слёзы горькой несправедливости начинают высыхать, когда они начинают понимать ужасную справедливость реальности, и принимать ее. Но именно слезы злости, испытание щедрости и принятие беспомощности, возможно, являются истинным источником великолепия их жизни. Их счастье -- не поверхностное и не безответственное. Они знают, что, как и ребёнок, несвободны. Они познали сострадание. Именно существование ребёнка и то, что они о нем знают, делают возможным благородство архитектуры, трогательность музыки, глубину науки. Именно благодаря этому ребёнку они так добры к детям. Они знают, что если бы несчастный ребёнок не чах в подвале, другой, играющий на флейте, не смог бы сочинять счастливую музыку в то время как молодые наездники готовятся к гонке в свете первого летнего утра.
А теперь вы в них верите? Разве они не стали более правдоподобными? Но есть кое-что еще, о чем я хочу рассказать, и это достаточно поразительно.
Время от времени один из подростков, которые приходят посмотреть на ребёнка, не возвращается домой, чтобы плакать или крушить, он вообще не возвращается домой. Иногда мужчина или женщина, гораздо старше их, затихает на день или два, а потом уходит. Эти люди идут на улицу и идут по ней в одиночестве. Они идут и идут, и выходят из Омеласа через красивые ворота. Они идут дальше через поля Омеласа. Каждый идёт сам по себе, парень или девушка, мужчина или женщина. Наступает ночь; путник должен пройти по деревенским улицам, между домами со светящимся теплом окнами, и дальше в темноту полей. Каждый сам по себе идёт на запад или север, к горам. Они идут и идут. Они покидают Омелас, идут навстречу темноте, и не возвращаются. Место, куда они идут, еще сложнее представить большинству из нас, чем город счастья. Я даже не могу его описать. Возможно, оно не существует. Но они, кажется, знают, куда они идут, те, что уходят прочь из Омеласа.

Translation education Bachelor's degree - Minsk State Linguistic University
Experience Years of experience: 9. Registered at ProZ.com: Dec 2020.
ProZ.com Certified PRO certificate(s) N/A
Credentials N/A
Memberships N/A
Software N/A
CV/Resume English (PDF)
Professional objectives
  • Meet new end/direct clients
  • Network with other language professionals
  • Get help with terminology and resources
  • Learn more about translation / improve my skills
  • Learn more about additional services I can provide my clients
  • Find a mentor
  • Stay up to date on what is happening in the language industry
  • Improve my productivity
Bio
No content specified


Profile last updated
Dec 22, 2020



More translators and interpreters: English to Russian - Russian to English   More language pairs