Insider Secrets from a Chief Interpreter – by Ewandro Magalhaes

By: BrauerTraining

Highly recommended to all interpreters (simultaneous AND consecutive).  I have been talking for years about the future of interpreting. I think Ewandro Magalhaes and his company Kudo have a pretty good handle on that. This is one to follow!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boost-your-interpreting-career-insider-secrets-from-a-chief-interpreter-tickets-46694799402

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Interpreters crucial actors at Trump-Kim meeting

Source: CNN
Story flagged by: Patrice

Very interesting summaries about the interpreters involved. Neither one originally intended to be an interpreter.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/12/world/trump-kim-summit-interpreter-trnd/index.html

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Celebrating ten years of translators and interpreters coming together in Cardiff

By: Jared Tabor

For those not familiar, a ProZ.com powwow is an informal, local get-together of language professionals. Any ProZ.com member can propose and organize a powwow in their area. Since 2001, thousands of powwows have been held around the world, in 110 countries.

So far, 454 powwows have been held in 63 cities in the UK, with 3,748 attendees total. At least 50 of those powwows have been organized by Victoria Burns and Alexandra Chapman. This May 5th, Alexandra and Victoria are celebrating 10 years of powwows in Cardiff by holding — you guessed it — another powwow!

I asked Alexandra and Victoria to talk a bit about how the Cardiff powwows got started, what the experience has been like, and what benefits they have been able to see from coming together in person with colleagues. Here is what they had to say:


Celebrating ten years of powwows in Cardiff is a great opportunity to reflect on how far we’ve come. Vicky and I met at the first Cardiff powwow, which came about as a result of Cardiff-based translators Vicky and Trinidad Clares meeting at an earlier powwow in nearby Bristol, back in May 2008 and immediately hit it off. We had both started translating the previous year, Vicky full time after deciding to finally bite the bullet and leave her job in export sales and me more gradually as my daughter started playschool. We had both studied languages at school and university, shared a love of travelling and hoped that a powwow would offer social opportunities to enhance our more solitary professional lives. It did that and more!

To date we’ve organised over 50 powwows between us with other local translators organising at least another 50 in that time. We’ve had attendees from all over the world with a wide variety of language combinations and we’ve heard about powwows in other countries where minutes are taken or talks are given. Ours are more informal, usually a meal or drinks in a city centre bar or restaurant where we chat about current projects, share tips on translation issues and plan our next social gathering. We’ve grown into a group of fifteen or twenty regulars of many different nationalities and we’re joined by new people almost every time we meet, usually on the first Saturday of the month. There’s been a Christmas powwow every year and often a summer picnic. We’ve celebrated birthdays, weddings and baby showers, with more and more children joining the scene, not to mention Vicky’s dog Alfie. Recently, we even arranged a Mother’s Day powwow and brought our mums along! That’s something we may now find we have to make an annual event….

IMG_3420

We travel further afield together too, organising a bunkhouse weekend and camping on the Gower Peninsula and attending translation conferences in Berlin (ELIA), Brescia (MET) and Vienna (BP18). Regular powwow attendee Juliet Haydock owns a house in Capena, near Rome, and that’s become a regular destination for some sunshine and co-working.

Perhaps the greatest outcome of the Cardiff powwows has been the foundation of ITI Cymru Wales, the Welsh network of the Institution of Translation and Interpreting (ITI), the UK’s professional association for practising translators and interpreters. Although founders Trinidad Clares and Elvana Moore initially met at a powwow in nearby Bristol, it was the Cardiff powwows that formed the recruitment ground for at least 28 of the current membership of 40, of which 15 to date (including Vicky and me) have taken the prestigious MITI assessment to become qualified members of the organisation. Its aims are to promote the highest standards within the profession by supporting on-going career development for language professionals and to represent the sector at the very highest level. When the ITI Conference was held in Cardiff in 2017, our members, who had met through the Cardiff powwows, played key roles in welcoming delegates to the city and organising fringe events alongside the informative talks.

Under this same banner, the Cardiff co-working sessions have become a weekly fixture, thanks to the organisational efforts of local boy Lloyd Bingham. We bring our laptops to a central café and work alongside each other, building ever-greater potential for professional collaboration. As several of us translate from German, another regular Andrew Godfrey recently initiated a Peer Review Group, where we all translate a text and then meet to discuss the relative merits of our different versions. It’s rather like a translation slam and is a great way to pick up new ideas for those ‘untranslatable’ expressions. We pick up new clients from powwow contacts too, stepping in when someone is on holiday and likewise passing on work in return, as I did when I was on maternity leave. This close collaboration is possible not only because of the trust brought about by friendship but also because of our mutual professional respect. As a group, we take the opportunity to learn from one another, rather than considering other translators to be competitors, and this mutual inspiration and support brings out the best in us all.

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We’ve come a long way since that first Cardiff powwow, and have plenty of exciting things in the pipeline for this year, including our 10th anniversary powwow in May, to which everyone who has attended a Cardiff powwow over the past 10 years has been invited, the seemingly now-annual summer picnic, another bunkhouse powwow and potentially a Cardiff translators’ ski trip next winter – our first ‘international’ powwow!

The on-going benefits are clear to see and they play a crucial role in our success as translators. What started as a simple lunch is now a fully-fledged network of high-calibre professionals even greater than the sum of its parts. If you’ve tended to shy away from networking, maybe it’s time to give it a try. And if there’s nothing in your area, setting something up is straightforward using either the ProZ.com powwow system or another social media channel. Meeting for lunch might just be the best thing you ever did for your career!


Well, there you have it! Congratulations to Victoria and Alexandra, to all the language professionals who have contributed to making these get-togethers a success, and have an excellent anniversary powwow!

If you are wondering whether there are extraordinary colleagues like these in your area, chances are there are– it’s simply a question of getting the ball rolling, and good things can happen.

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Translation and interpretation services in English unaffected by Brexit

Source: The Guardian
Story flagged by: Thomas T. Frost

The Guardian: EU has no plans to downgrade use of English after Brexit

According to this article, The European commission’s proposed budget for 2021-27 confirms that the EU has no intention to reduce the use of English in its meetings or documents. “Translation and interpretation services in the English language will also remain unaffected.”

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Thoughts on translating poetry: one poet/translator’s take

Source: NPR, All Things Considered
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

NPR has been celebrating National Poetry Month in the US on Twitter, using the hashtag #NPRPoetry. A recent post posed the question of whether poetry can be translated or if “Poetry is what gets lost in translation.” Poet and translator Aaron Coleman translates one of the poetry submissions and discusses his method.

“I approach translation even knowing that it can’t quite be what it is in the original language,” he says.

The language lapses that inhibit an ideal interpretation can ultimately be “a creative, productive failure,” he adds. “Maybe it can open up a new way for us to see what can happen in English and what can happen in Spanish, for me, or whatever the original language is.”

Instead, translation can be transformation. “I think we all want to have translation work as a process of reproduction, but it’s really a process of transformation,” Coleman says.

Read/hear more >>

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Amazon offers nine free works in translation (e-book format) until World Book Day

By: Jared Tabor

World Book Day is April 23rd. To celebrate, Amazon is offering a selection of award-winning works from around the world, all of which have been translated to English, for free for Kindle. You can grab them between now and April 24th at https://www.amazon.com/article/read-the-world

(there may be geographical or other limits on who can get these books for free– apparently they are free to US-based customers, and discounted in other regions)

Among the books, I spotted The Light of the Fireflies, by Paul Pen and translated by ProZ.com member Simon Bruni.

The book cover of The Light of the Fireflies by Paul Pen. Translated by Simon Bruni. The cover shows a firefly alit on a concrete wall, its blue paint cracked and peeling away.

Check out this and the other titles available for free on Kindle until the 24th >>

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Amazon selects One Hour Translation as partner for NMT-based solutions

Source: PR Newswire
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

In relation to Amazon’s new service, Amazon Translate, One Hour Translation has been announced as partner in the delivery of Neural Machine Translation (NMT) services to enterprise customers. From the press release:

One Hour Translation, the world’s leading hybrid translation agency and largest online translation agency, announced that Amazon has selected it as a key partner to deliver Neural Machine Translation (NMT) based solutions to enterprise customers.

NMT is a revolutionary technology allowing computers to perform human-like translations that make sense.

One Hour Translation combines Neural Machine Translation (NMT) technology with human post-editing and quality control, delivering high-quality human level translation, that costs much less and is done much faster than the human only alternative.

OHT is already using the Amazon NMT engine to improve the translation efficiency of enterprise customers such as iHerb, a world leader in food supplements, and other customers.

OHT allows business customers to fully leverage and benefit from the powerful NMT technology. OHT’s software is connected to all the top NMT engines, and adds a multi-step, streamlined process, before and after the NMT stage itself in order to provide business customers with a complete end-to-end solution.

Using One Hour Translation, business customers can send up to hundreds of thousands of projects in parallel for translation. The OHT hybrid system will select, on the fly, the most appropriate NMT engine, as well as the required pre-processing, post-editing, and quality control measures needed in order to deliver high-quality translation to business customers.

“Hybrid NMT based systems are the future of professional translation services,” says Ofer Shoshan, founder & CEO of One Hour Translation. “OHT’s hybrid translation system allows our top customers to receive high quality translations at a fraction of the cost and time of human only translation. We see growing interest from customers in hybrid translations and we have enterprise customers who are already using it,” added Shoshan. “We believe in NMT and will announce new NMT related products and services in the next few weeks,” he concluded.

Read more >>

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How translation tech is making travel easier

Source: Wired
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

Just as services like Google Maps have made it easier to get around, at home or abroad, some advances in translation tech are making it easier to travel in places where one may not know the language.

Right now this translation tech is still in its infancy and primarily eases logistical complexities. With Google Translate, you can point your camera at a street sign to verify it says “Downtown This Way” and not “There Be Dragons.” The same app can quickly translate a menu—if not always perfectly, then well enough to be sure that you’re ordering chicken.

The article goes on to consider how far this technology might improve, up to a future where we’re all wearing earpieces and hearing or being simultaneously interpreted for in our conversations. Sound familiar?

Read more >>

What do you think? Will this eventually be a practical possibility?

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Microsoft Translator App now with AI offline services for Android, iOS, Amazon devices

Source: Gadgets 360°
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

Microsoft Translator has been upgraded to offer artificial intelligence (AI) powered offline language packs across all Android, iOS, and Amazon Fire devices. The AI-powered offline language packs were previously limited to devices with a dedicated AI chip. However, Microsoft engineers have now leveraged edge computing to bring AI-backed neural machine translation (NMT) to the masses. The Translator team is also in plans to bring the new experience to Windows devices in the coming future.

The Redmond company in 2016 built its NMT model for online use only as it required high-quality translation models. But in 2017, the experience debuted on select Android devices that are equipped with a dedicated AI chip. It brought offline translation quality in line with the quality offered by the original online neural translation model. And now, the Translator team has optimised the initial offline-specific algorithms to bring language packs irrespective of any particular hardware.

Read more >>

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Lera Boroditsky on how language shapes the way we think (TED talk)

Source: TED
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

Here’s an interesting look at the different ways language may shape the way we think, with some fascinating examples from different languages/cultures around the world:

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AI interpreting system gets nervous and has a mistake-laden debut

By: Jared Tabor

Artificial Intelligence is not quite ready to take jobs from capable human interpreters/translators. At the recent Boao Forum for Asia, one company debuted an AI system designed to provide interpreting and transcripts, only to have the system produce a mix of mistranslations, repeated words and garbled characters in the live demonstration.

The makers of the software admitted to the mistakes, pointing out that the AI “is still learning and growing” and would continue to improve over time.

Read more at:

South China Morning Post

Abacus News

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Amazon releases its own neural MT service

Source: Amazon
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

Amazon announced this month it was releasing “Amazon Translate”. From the announcement:

Today we’re excited to make Amazon Translate generally available. Late last year at AWS re:Invent my colleague Tara Walker wrote about a preview of a new AI service, Amazon Translate. Starting today you can access Amazon Translate in US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland) with a 2 million character monthly free tier for the first 12 months and $15 per million characters after that. There are a number of new features available in GA: automatic source language inference, Amazon CloudWatch support, and up to 5000 characters in a single TranslateText call.

See more >>

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A Translator’s Diary: A Year in the Life of Emma Ramdan

Source: The Quarterly Conversation
Story flagged by: Hend Saeed

“What is it like to live day-to-day as a translator? What are the worries and the stresses, the pleasures and the reliefs? How does a translator get by, and where do her projects fit into the rest of her life? In this new year-long feature, translator Emma Ramdan gives us some answers by keeping an open diary about a year her life.”

http://quarterlyconversation.com/a-translators-diary-a-year-in-the-life-of-emma-ramadan

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Interpreters need to learn from actors

By: Claudia Brauer

Interpreting in 2018 is becoming progressively more of an audiovisual experience in remote encounters, than the face-to-face meetings of the past. As such, in my opinion, there is one issue that interpreters of the 21st century need now more than ever: EMPATHY, the ability to understand and SHARE the feelings of another human being.

As a trained actor from my days of youth, I believe that many of the techniques that are used by actors should be used by remote interpreters; as conduits of the thoughts of another being, those thoughts never exist in a vacuum. Thoughts are intimately related not only to our culture and the patterns of our society but also to our feelings, for thoughts control feelings (and feelings influence thoughts).


Good actors make us suspend disbelief and see THROUGH them the character that they are portraying. We see those “other” human beings (they portray) in all their strength and frailty because the actors are able to get themselves “out of the way” and BECOME a true conduit of the thoughts and feelings of the character they portray.

Good actors, therefore, achieve selfless results (i.e., we see “another” instead of the actor) by developing total EMPATHY for their character. So too, it is my belief, that we, as interpreters, are conduits for the expression of another’s words and feelings. In that sense, it is too little to ask that we “simply” convey words. We MUST convey the words in total accuracy, but we must ALSO convey the thoughts and feelings that are attached to those words. EMPATHY allows us to do so, or at least to try our best. It is this human-ness that will indeed separate us from the likes of bilingual Siris!


In accordance with the website “Skillsyouneed.com“:

Empathy is, at its simplest, awareness of the feelings and emotions of other people. It is a key element of Emotional Intelligence, the link between self and others, because it is how we as individuals understand what others are experiencing as if we were feeling it ourselves…

Three Types of Empathy

Psychologists have identified three types of empathy: cognitive empathy, emotional empathy and compassionate empathy.

Cognitive empathy is understanding someone’s thoughts and emotions, in a very rational, rather than emotional sense.

Emotional empathy is also known as emotional contagion, and is ‘catching’ someone else’s feelings, so that you literally feel them too.

Compassionate empathy is understanding someone’s feelings, and taking appropriate action to help.


So, how do we develop EMPATHY? There are many techniques and exercises. I found some very interesting by Martha Beck, appropriately called The Empathy Workout:

[Excerpts]

EXERCISE 1: LEARNING TO LISTEN

…start with conversation. Once a day, ask a friend, “How are you?” in a way that says you mean it. If they give you a stock answer (“Fine”), repeat the question: “No, really. How are you?” You’ll soon realize that if your purpose is solely to understand, rather than to advise or protect, you can work a kind of magic: In the warmth of genuine caring, people open up like flowers….

EXERCISE 2: REVERSE ENGINEERING

Some mechanical engineers spend their time disassembling machines to see how they were originally put together. You can use a similar technique to develop empathy, by working backward from the observable effects of emotion to the emotion itself. Think of someone you’d like to understand…Remember a recent interaction… Now imitate, as closely as you can, the physical posture, facial expression, exact words, and vocal inflection they used during that encounter. Notice what emotions arise within you. What you feel will probably be very close to whatever the other person was going through…

EXERCISE 3: SHAPE-SHIFTING

In folklore, shape-shifters are beings with the ability to become anyone or anything. As a child, I was fascinated by this concept and used to pretend that I could instantaneously switch places with other people, animals, even inanimate objects… I recommend you try it, soon. See that strange man in the orange polyester suit putting 37 packets of sweetener into his extra-grande mochaccino with soy milk? What if— zap!—you suddenly switched bodies with him? What would it be like to wear that suit, that face, that physique? What impulse would lead to sugaring a cup of coffee like that, let alone drinking it?

EXERCISE 4: METTA-TATION

World-class empathizers…conduct a daily regimen of metta, or lovingkindness, meditation. This involves focusing all of one’s attention on a certain individual and offering loving wishes to that person with each breath you take, for several minutes at a time. Classic metta practice starts with your own sweet self. For five minutes, with each breath, offer yourself kind thoughts… Then switch the focus of your kind thoughts onto a friend or family member. When you feel a sense of emotional union with that person, target someone you barely know….


ACTION ITEM: Give it a try!

[Originally posted on WordPress by Claudia Brauer (BrauerTraining)]

https://claudiabrauer.wordpress.com/2018/04/06/new-beginnings-interpreting/

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Five Spanish novels about translators available in English

Source: ASYMPTOTE
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

If you are interested in reading fiction where translators are among the protagonists, you may want to check out this review of five different novels, originally written in Spanish but also available in an English translation:

https://www.asymptotejournal.com/blog/2018/03/28/on-translators-in-translation-spanish-novels-about-translators-available-in-english-translation/

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Advice on standing out in translation and interpreting, from the ATA Chronicle

Source: The ATA Chronicle
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

Lists of things you need to do to get/be/become something else usually contain at least a few pieces of advice we already know. But it can be beneficial to remind ourselves of those things every now and then, to stop and think about what we could be doing differently. A recent article in the ATA Chronicle discusses nine strategies for standing out to potential clients and collaborators: http://www.atanet.org/chronicle-online/featured/nine-ways-to-stand-out-in-the-translation-and-interpreting-industry/#sthash.MOkLRezD.dpbs

What do you think? What would you add to (or subtract from) that list?

- Jared

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The Economist on languages in films

Source: The Economist
Story flagged by: Marjolein Snippe

The Economist has a fortnightly feature on language and linguistics which is often interesting and/or amusing. Last week’s issue advocated for more foreign languages in Hollywood movies.

https://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21738861-use-xhosa-black-panther-gave-it-foreign-flair-directors-can-be

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New log in options for ProZ.com with Google, Facebook and LinkedIn

By: Jared Tabor

In case you had not noticed, you can now log in to your ProZ.com account using your Google, Facebook, or LinkedIn credentials.

These log in options are provided to make it easier to jump to your ProZ.com account, or to access your account in the event of a forgotten password.

If you run a website or application and would like to allow your users the option of signing in with their ProZ.com accounts, you can find out how here.

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Marketing for freelance translators and interpreters who hate marketing

By: Jared Tabor

no_more_wheat_karen

recent survey of freelancers centered around their marketing efforts showed some interesting finds:

  • 55% of freelancers spend 3 hours a week on their online marketing efforts
  • 51% of respondents considered marketing too time-consuming, and 41% felt marketing was too costly
  • 83% are investing financially in online marketing of some sort
  • 72% say they are spending less than but up to 100 USD a month in marketing (those who spend more than that report earning more)
  • The average survey respondent had reached their income goal within two years of starting out

The survey sample were some 2,000 US freelancers of all types, so it is reasonable to expect those numbers to be somewhat different if we narrow it down to translators and interpreters, expand the sample to other countries, or both.

One number in particular that caught my eye was the monthly investment in marketing. 100 USD a month sounded pretty steep to me, but maybe I’m wrong. 1,200 USD in freelancer marketing a year. Do you spend that much on your marketing? If so, drop me a line, I’d be very interested in hearing about it and if you find it to be a good investment.

If you are already a paying ProZ.com member, you are spending between 12 and 18 dollars a month on marketing through your membership, though you get all the rest of the tools and opportunities available along with it. It’s a kind of marketing that is easy to do, what we’d call passive marketing.

Be an ant, not a grasshopper

For some kinds of work, sending CVs, applications, emails, calling or meeting potential clients, printing business cards or flyers, posting ads, and all of that active marketing, can be effective. Many freelance translators and interpreters find that kind of marketing tiring, frustrating, and also expensive, both in terms of money and time. You’d rather be translating or interpreting, right?

You may have to rush to do active marketing if you suddenly find yourself short on clients or workload. This tends to happen when a freelancer has no kind of marketing in place while they are fully-booked, a bit like the grasshopper who watched the ant stock up for winter, unworried during the summer because food was plentiful, and then sorely unprepared for the winter.

Passive marketing is your ant stocking up for winter. It can help save you from the unexpected, even though work might be plentiful now. And sometimes it’s a gateway to new opportunities that can pop up and replace what you’ve got going on with something even better.

Where is your shop window?

As I said, passive marketing is easier to do, if you do it right, and the time/monetary investment is quite different too. It basically consists of opening up a brightly-lit shop window (your online presence) on a bustling street. Many people walk by, window shopping, but if your shop has the right goods (your services, expertise, samples, things that make you stand out), shoppers will pop in to look and talk to you. Some will be interested in buying now, some will simply make a note of your shop for when they do need what you have to offer.

Where is that bustling street, though? Well, ProZ.com is one of them. You should have a professional online presence in any serious work-related venue for language professionals (a profile on LinkedIn, for example). But since ProZ.com is the busiest street when it comes to searching for and finding language professionals, if you are not figuring there as prominently as possible, you are definitely missing out on client contact. So that ProZ.com membership, roughly the cost of a new pair of shoes per year, is all you need to keep your shop window on the busiest street in the industry.
where_is_your_shop
Check your directory ranking in your top language pair and area of expertise. What page of the results are you on? How many pages of results will your ideal client browse through to get to you? They say, “The best place to hide a dead body is on page 2 of Google search results.” Directory results work in a similar way. Chances are, by the time a client has gone a few pages in, they’ve already found the people they are looking for.

Don’t waste my time

Now, when I say “online presence” I don’t mean having a profile registered on a place and having the bare minimum of information filled out there. Nowadays, if I’m looking for a service/service provider online, I don’t even look twice at people who have not put some time investment into presenting their services. No picture? No thanks. No real name? See ya. No details about the services you offer or why I should choose you? Don’t waste my time! This is where the time investment comes in. It’s mostly an up-front investment. Put in the time to craft that presentation, then go do whatever else you want, and let it go to work for you in the background.

Now think about your two biggest clients…

I’ve got all the clients I can handle right now, no need, you might say. OK! But how many times would you try to go back to a shop that was closed every time you went there?

Now, think about your two biggest clients. Would you be in trouble if tomorrow, through no fault of your own, you lost those two clients? If so, why not put your shop window out there, and occasionally field an inquiry from an interested potential client? The worst that can happen is that you’ll make some new contacts while you’re working, and heaven forbid your fully-booked status should change, you’ll have some good leads to work with.

What’s in your shop window?

Now go over to your ProZ.com profile. At the top of your profile you will see a link to “Force visitor view”. Click on that. What you see is what any visitor to your profile will see when they are evaluating working with you. Put yourself in the shoes, or eyes, of your ideal client. Does what you see there look professional, attractive, keep your interest, “sell” you on the idea of contacting this person with a work offer? Does it speak to that person’s strengths, what makes them different from the competition?

shop_window
By the way, if you are looking for ways to build, update, or fine tune your online presentation, many of the same principles of decorating a real shop window apply! Thinking about it this way may also help get your creative juices going. If you need some inspiration, you can find some pointers here:
https://www.appearhere.co.uk/inspire/blog/how-to-dress-your-shop-window

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Survey results on freelancing and marketing

By: Jared Tabor

A survey of freelancers and the results were recently published by Wise Brand. The company focuses on providing marketing services, so the survey is mostly centered on marketing efforts and results. Some of the numbers:

  • 55% of freelancers spend 3 hours a week on their online marketing efforts
  • 51% of respondents considered marketing too time-consuming, and 41% felt marketing was too costly
  • 83% are investing financially in online marketing of some sort
  • 72% say they are spending less than 100 USD a month in marketing
  • The average survey respondent had reached their income goal within two years of starting out

You can read more in this article on Entrepreneur: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/308524

Or see the report by Wise Brand: http://wisebrand.co/state-of-the-freelance-nation-survey/press-release/

How do these results compare with your own experience? Are numbers like these likely to be very different among freelance language professionals specifically?

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