Pronounced “ter-JIV-er-sate”, it means “to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc.; equivocate.”

The word’s origins come from the Latin for “to turn one’s back”. Though not in common usage, it was utilized by The Times of London in August to describe the changing attitudes of stock markets.
According to Schwartz, the team considered other words, including “occupy”, “austerity”, “jobs” (both the noun and the person), “zugzwang” and “insidious”.
However, though they may have tergiversated during their discussions, there will be no more tergiversation on the matter. It’s Dictionary.com’s Word of The Year 2011.