Applying for a Job Posting – How can I get more positive replies?

Formats: Webinar presentations
Topics: Getting established in the translation industry
Business of Translation and Interpreting
Business skills for translators
Grow your translation business
Marketing tools for translators
Risk management for translators

Course summary
Start time:Jul 2, 2015 15:00 GMT     Add to calendar

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Language:English
Summary:How to apply to a job posting and have chances to be hired: All steps required from checking out the outsourcer, composing your resume, presenting your credentials, improving your CV on the way, up to finally applying for the actual job. What are the common mistakes we make when applying for a job through an online job posting? What could be improved in our applications? What you should do and what should be avoided after your application has been submitted.
Description
We see a lot of job postings on-line every day and we tend to send our resume for many of them, thus the (positive) replies we receive are not that many. Why does this happen?

Working as well as an outsourcer and posting jobs on-line I have seen hundreds of applications. What makes me smile when the application comes in and what makes me want to delete the application instantly (in the end I don’t, but I would love to!).
What are the common mistakes we do and how could they be avoided?

• Drafting you resume: what information should be included
• How to create a good resume using your existing resources
• How to improve your resume with additional resources obtained on the way
• Important steps before applying to a job posting: what to check before you apply
• How to apply for a job posting: what to send, how to send it and what to expect
• Follow-up: After a job posting and after a job completion


After the presentation there will be enough time to discuss any issues and reply to all questions arising from the presentation or things you always wanted to ask. You may send your questions in advance if you wish, using the forum under the webinar’s description
Target audience
New professionals
Learning objectives
• How to “read” the job posting
• Shall I apply or better not? The constant dilemma.
• Presenting yourself: Cover letter + Resume
• Additional value to your resume – what makes you stand out from the crowd?
• What makes an application eligible after all?
• Common mistakes in job applications and how to avoid them
• What do outsourcers love and what they hate
Prerequisites
None
Program
Click to expand
• Drafting you resume: what information should be included
• How to create a good resume using your existing resources
• How to improve your resume with additional resources obtained on the way
• Important steps before applying for a job posting: what to check before you apply
• How to apply to a job posting: what to send, how to send it and what to expect
• Follow-up: After a job posting and after a job completion


After the presentation there will be enough time to discuss any issues and reply to all questions arising from the presentation or things you always wanted to ask. You may send your questions in advance if you wish, using the forum under the webinar’s description
Software and system requirements (click to expand)
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Virtual platform system requirements
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Registration and payment information (click to expand)
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Trainer
 Irene Koukia    View feedback | View all courses
Bio: Irene Koukia was born in Germany.

She obtained the Travel and Tourism Consultant Diploma from IATA/UFTAA in 1992 and successfully completed the One-year translator training program at meta|φραση School of Translator Training in 2010. She also obtained a diploma as a Personal & Business Coach from ILS GmbH in April 2015, and she is studying Business Administration at the Hellenic Open University.

She is working as a Technical Translator, mainly from German/English to Greek, at her own company, Metafrasma Ltd, since 2008. She also works as a Trainer for ProZ.com since 2011, and as a Tutor for meta|φραση School of Translator Training since 2015. She is the National Representative of STEMG for Greece, following the nomination by the HASDIG, providing training and certification for ASD-STE100.
Comments about this course

Applying for a Job Posting – How can I get more positive replies?

David C P Lo Identity Verified
Hong Kong
Local time: 18:16
Member (2015)
Chinese to English
+ ...
Tips for inexperienced translatorMay 13, 2015

Dear Irene,
I would be most grateful if you would spend a minute in the webinar to give suggestions to someone who has literally no experience in doing paid translation work - how can I make my resume (and myself) look promising?
An additional problem of mine is that my original (non-translation) "areas of expertise" is music (classical) and special education, fields in which job postings are practically non-existent. Will I be asking too much if I wish that this kind of problems woul
... See more
Dear Irene,
I would be most grateful if you would spend a minute in the webinar to give suggestions to someone who has literally no experience in doing paid translation work - how can I make my resume (and myself) look promising?
An additional problem of mine is that my original (non-translation) "areas of expertise" is music (classical) and special education, fields in which job postings are practically non-existent. Will I be asking too much if I wish that this kind of problems would be addressed when you talk about jobs we should apply to?
Thank you very much in advance.
Collapse


 

Catarina_Ara (X)
Portugal
Local time: 10:16
English to Portuguese
inexperienced translatorMay 13, 2015

I'm also interested on this subject.
I'm new to this site and tying to figure out where to beginicon_smile.gif


 

Bernhard Sulzer Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:16
Member (2006)
English to German
+ ...
Understanding the translation market and one's position as a translator in it is crucial for successMay 14, 2015

I believe it's very important to relate to newcomers that they are service providers, thus independent business women and men. I don't understand myself as someone "applying for a job" with a resume/CV, even if that is what many outsourcers who are posting "projects" here and at other translation portals are requesting. I am not saying that presenting your background the best way isn't important, but there are other professional ways I would recommend are more important to achieve success that d... See more
I believe it's very important to relate to newcomers that they are service providers, thus independent business women and men. I don't understand myself as someone "applying for a job" with a resume/CV, even if that is what many outsourcers who are posting "projects" here and at other translation portals are requesting. I am not saying that presenting your background the best way isn't important, but there are other professional ways I would recommend are more important to achieve success that doesn't hinge on applying for jobs on job boards. I know "How to get more positive replies applying for a job posting" is the focus of this particular webinar, but to be helpful to newcomers, one needs to step out of the box/think outside the box or at least look at the whole picture. I can't say more here.
Understanding one's position in this market and acting accordingly is critical for success. It will determine how you approach any project professionally. I don't see how a webinar asking newcomers to apply with their resumes for individual projects posted on translation portals can be a basis for that understanding. But from the comments above I can see that newcomers are most interested in how to be/become successful. And that takes a lot of understanding for our profession. Thus my comments.

[Edited at 2015-05-14 15:16 GMT]
Collapse


 

Bernhard Sulzer Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 05:16
Member (2006)
English to German
+ ...
Sending out resumesMay 14, 2015

PS: I also recommend discussing what unwanted things can happen if one posts or sends out one's resume to outsourcers. This is especially important to know in case an outsourcer contacts you and asks for your resume. See other posts in the forum concerning resume/identity theft and tenders.

 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:16
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Where to beginMay 14, 2015

Catarina_Araujo wrote:

I'm also interested on this subject.
I'm new to this site and tying to figure out where to beginicon_smile.gif


Spend time working on your Proz profile and make it as complete as you can. Update it periodically.

That's the key thing. Your Proz profile isn't just an intereresting read. Search engines will find you through it - but make sure you use good metatags (the words that search engines look for).

[Edited at 2015-05-14 14:17 GMT]


 

AnneMarieG Identity Verified
France
Local time: 11:16
Member (2009)
German to French
+ ...
Very simple:May 14, 2015

raise your rateicon_wink.gif

 

Catarina_Ara (X)
Portugal
Local time: 10:16
English to Portuguese
Thank youMay 14, 2015

Tom in London wrote:

Catarina_Araujo wrote:

I'm also interested on this subject.
I'm new to this site and tying to figure out where to beginicon_smile.gif


Spend time working on your Proz profile and make it as complete as you can. Update it periodically.

That's the key thing. Your Proz profile isn't just an intereresting read. Search engines will find you through it - but make sure you use good metatags (the words that search engines look for).

[Edited at 2015-05-14 14:17 GMT]


Thank you Tom for the feedback.


 

Irene Koukia Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:16
Member (2008)
German to Greek
+ ...
Tips for inexperienced translatorMay 31, 2015

Hi David,

thank you for your message.
I am afraid that the information you need is subject to another Webinar and can't be included in the present one. This one contains only what is mentioned above (and other related information). The Webinar you need is "Starting to work as a translator, gaining experience, improving services provided, spreading the word" (see: ...
See more
Hi David,

thank you for your message.
I am afraid that the information you need is subject to another Webinar and can't be included in the present one. This one contains only what is mentioned above (and other related information). The Webinar you need is "Starting to work as a translator, gaining experience, improving services provided, spreading the word" (see: http://www.proz.com/translator-training/course/11554-starting_to_work_as_a_translator_gaining_experience_improving_services_provided_spreading_the_word). Keep an eye on the upcoming Webinars in order to secure your seat for the next dateicon_smile.gif
Best regards,
Irene


davidtrlns wrote:

Dear Irene,
I would be most grateful if you would spend a minute in the webinar to give suggestions to someone who has literally no experience in doing paid translation work - how can I make my resume (and myself) look promising?
An additional problem of mine is that my original (non-translation) "areas of expertise" is music (classical) and special education, fields in which job postings are practically non-existent. Will I be asking too much if I wish that this kind of problems would be addressed when you talk about jobs we should apply to?
Thank you very much in advance.


[Edited at 2015-05-31 18:08 GMT]
Collapse


 

Irene Koukia Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:16
Member (2008)
German to Greek
+ ...
inexperienced translatorMay 31, 2015

Hi Catarina,

I already replied to David on this one, so the same applies to your question as wellicon_smile.gif

Best regards,
Irene

Catarina_Araujo wrote:

I'm also interested on this subject.
I'm new to this site and tying to figure out where to beginicon_smile.gif


 

Irene Koukia Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:16
Member (2008)
German to Greek
+ ...
Understanding the translation market and one's position as a translator in it is crucial for successMay 31, 2015

Hi Bernhard,

I agree with you, yes, if you are already established you don't apply to Job Postings any longer. If you are starting out now, you may need some guidance in avoiding common mistakes and get ideas on standing out from the crowdicon_wink.gif

Best regards,
Irene

Bernhard Sulzer wrote:

I believe it's very important to relate to newcomers that they are service providers, thus independent business women and men. I don't understand myself as someone "applying for a job" with a resume/CV, even if that is what many outsourcers who are posting "projects" here and at other translation portals are requesting. I am not saying that presenting your background the best way isn't important, but there are other professional ways I would recommend are more important to achieve success that doesn't hinge on applying for jobs on job boards. I know "How to get more positive replies applying for a job posting" is the focus of this particular webinar, but to be helpful to newcomers, one needs to step out of the box/think outside the box or at least look at the whole picture. I can't say more here.
Understanding one's position in this market and acting accordingly is critical for success. It will determine how you approach any project professionally. I don't see how a webinar asking newcomers to apply with their resumes for individual projects posted on translation portals can be a basis for that understanding. But from the comments above I can see that newcomers are most interested in how to be/become successful. And that takes a lot of understanding for our profession. Thus my comments.

[Edited at 2015-05-14 15:16 GMT]


[Edited at 2015-06-11 16:35 GMT]


 

Irene Koukia Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:16
Member (2008)
German to Greek
+ ...
Where to beginMay 31, 2015

Hi Tom and Catarina,

you might also be interested in FREE Webinar: "Meeting clients at ProZ.com" available here: http://www.proz.com/translator-training/course/11857-meeting_clients_at_prozcom
It should cover all questions on presenting yourself on Proz.comicon_smile.gif

Best regards,
Irene


Tom in London wrote:

Catarina_Araujo wrote:

I'm also interested on this subject.
I'm new to this site and tying to figure out where to beginicon_smile.gif


Spend time working on your Proz profile and make it as complete as you can. Update it periodically.

That's the key thing. Your Proz profile isn't just an intereresting read. Search engines will find you through it - but make sure you use good metatags (the words that search engines look for).

[Edited at 2015-05-14 14:17 GMT]


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 08:16
English to Portuguese
+ ...
It is not that simpleMay 31, 2015

AnneMarieG wrote:

[b]Very simple:[/i]

raise your rateicon_wink.gif


After four decades in this industry, almost 3/4 of them as a freelancer, I looked back and realized how rates have an impact on positive replies.

The details are not relevant here, but in January 2010 I had - for exchange rate reasons - to choose between raising my international rates by 20% and dropping my foreign clients (which accounted for 80% of my income in 2014) altogether. For the record, my rates in my domestic currency have remained unchanged since July 1994 - advances in IT boosted my productivity enough to cover inflation etc. etc.

So in Jan. 2010 I braced myself financially to face a sharp drop in business, and took the plunge, raised my rates by 20%. I immediately lost all the clients not really worth keeping. The good ones are still with me as of today. The amazing thing is that there was no drop in business! With my higher rate, I was soon approached by a new breed of clients, who demanded the level of service I had been delivering since 1973, and who did not believe it was possible to get for my previous rate. These are still with me as of today.

Go out on the street, and look at the cars you see going by. Watch only for new passenger cars. There are large, luxury ones, as well as small barebones "means of transportation". Between one group and the other, there is a whole gamut. At every level of this gamut, several options exist, from different manufacturers.

Go to a liquor store, you'll see the same variety. The most extreme case I ever saw in one same store was some lo-grade domestic brandy for $7 a liter... and French cognac for $5,000 in a smaller bottle. Both are "booze" distilled from wine, made of grapes from the same Earth.

Likewise, translations are done by red-blooded human beings.

So it's a very delicate act to set your rates in a way to match your service level, and hence to match customer expectations. After you have set them, if you have reliable assurance that they represent a fair cost/benefit ratio in the marketplace, stick to them!

If a prospect doesn't react in a "positive" to your carefully balanced rates, most likely it's because they are not looking for your level of service. They want something better or worse than what you offer. Of course, you should offer a level of service that holds potential demand, otherwise you'll be restricted to either absolute perfectionists, or your business will be engulfed by free online machine translation.

A wino doesn't need the $5 grand cognac to get stoned drunk. A connaisseur won't buy cheap hooch, not even to disinfect his toothbrush.


 

Robin Joensuu Identity Verified
Germany
Local time: 11:16
Member
English to Swedish
+ ...
Rates signal confidenceJun 1, 2015

After four decades in this industry, almost 3/4 of them as a freelancer, I looked back and realized how rates have an impact on positive replies.


I can really relate to this. I have not worked as a translator nearly as long as you have, but after three years, I decided to raise my rates quite a lot to a level close to the Swedish average rates, and got a lot of new business from it.

I think this is because 1) I signalled to outsorurcers that I am the real deal, and 2) I told myself that I do my job well enough to get paid decently for it, which, I think, boosted by own confidence. After all, if you don't think you are worth your rates yourself, it will be hard for your to convince others.

Another thing worth considering is that you need 20% less work to make the same amount of money if you raise your rates with 20 %.

Well, perhaps a bit off topic.


 

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