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momzer

English translation: bastard

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16:23 Aug 6, 2003
Yiddish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Yiddish term or phrase: momzer
negative description of person
charles o'brien
English translation:bastard
Explanation:
Momzer: a bastard, used in the same literal and figurately senses as it is used in English. "My boss is such a momzer!"
Bubby's Yiddish Glossary

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Note added at 8 mins (2003-08-06 16:31:51 GMT)
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No halachic discussion of shidduchim can avoid the serious subject of what the Torah calls \"momzer.\" A momzer is the descendant of a coupling prohibited by the Torah (e.g. adultery or close relatives) and is only allowed to marry another momzer. Momzer status is irreversible and continues in all descendants for all generations. All Jewish families are considered kosher when there is no reason to suspect otherwise. But, when there is reason to suspect a single might be a momzer (e.g. if the single person\'s mother was married previously to a man other than the single\'s father, and there is reason to believe there was no halachic get [Jewish law divorce] from the first husband) this requires investigation (check practical questions with a rov). A \"soffaik momzer\" [a \"maybe momzer\"] is more serious, in shidduchim terms, than a \"definite momzer\" [Evven Ha\'Ezzer, Hilchos Pirya Virivya] because he or she can not marry anyone at all, since marriage between a momzer and non-momzer is a strict Torah prohibition. If (s)he turns out to be a momzer, (s)he cannot marry a kosher Jew. If (s)he turns out to be a kosher Jew, (s)he cannot marry a momzer. A soffaik momzer is stuck, unable to marry anybody, until a determination one way or the other is made by a universally accepted rov [Torah law authority who has fear of Heaven] or bais din [Torah court]. A definite momzer can marry another definite momzer. A SHIDDUCH MUST ONLY BE BETWEEN DEFINITE MEMBERS OF THE SAME CATEGORY.
http://www.shemayisrael.com/rabbiforsythe/zivug/matchmaking....
Selected response from:

Jarema
Ukraine
Local time: 08:44
Grading comment
a terrific answer; thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2bastard
Jarema
4bastard
Cristina Moldovan do Amaral


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
bastard


Explanation:
Momzer: a bastard, used in the same literal and figurately senses as it is used in English. "My boss is such a momzer!"
Bubby's Yiddish Glossary

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2003-08-06 16:31:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No halachic discussion of shidduchim can avoid the serious subject of what the Torah calls \"momzer.\" A momzer is the descendant of a coupling prohibited by the Torah (e.g. adultery or close relatives) and is only allowed to marry another momzer. Momzer status is irreversible and continues in all descendants for all generations. All Jewish families are considered kosher when there is no reason to suspect otherwise. But, when there is reason to suspect a single might be a momzer (e.g. if the single person\'s mother was married previously to a man other than the single\'s father, and there is reason to believe there was no halachic get [Jewish law divorce] from the first husband) this requires investigation (check practical questions with a rov). A \"soffaik momzer\" [a \"maybe momzer\"] is more serious, in shidduchim terms, than a \"definite momzer\" [Evven Ha\'Ezzer, Hilchos Pirya Virivya] because he or she can not marry anyone at all, since marriage between a momzer and non-momzer is a strict Torah prohibition. If (s)he turns out to be a momzer, (s)he cannot marry a kosher Jew. If (s)he turns out to be a kosher Jew, (s)he cannot marry a momzer. A soffaik momzer is stuck, unable to marry anybody, until a determination one way or the other is made by a universally accepted rov [Torah law authority who has fear of Heaven] or bais din [Torah court]. A definite momzer can marry another definite momzer. A SHIDDUCH MUST ONLY BE BETWEEN DEFINITE MEMBERS OF THE SAME CATEGORY.
http://www.shemayisrael.com/rabbiforsythe/zivug/matchmaking....


    Reference: http://www.bubbygram.com/yiddishglossary.htm
Jarema
Ukraine
Local time: 08:44
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in pair: 7
Grading comment
a terrific answer; thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: or untrustworth
1 min
  -> Thank you!

agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
2 mins
  -> Thank you!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bastard


Explanation:
child of a prohibited relationship

"Just like the word momzer in Yiddish, which is literally "bastard." It's generally used in a more angry tone than is the word schmuck. But again, no one is really saying that the guy they're calling a bastard is legally a bastard. He's just a bastard in the other person's eyes.

When you call a guy a bastard, or a momzer, you're saying the man's an idiot, he's a jerk, he's a goof, he's a lowlife, he's a real good-for-nothing schmuck."



    Reference: http://www.jackiemason.com/jewishexcerpt.html
Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
United States
Local time: 23:44
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
PRO pts in pair: 4
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