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kumbaya

Polish translation: wziąć sobie coś bardzo do serca, napalić się na coś

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:be all kumbaya
Polish translation:wziąć sobie coś bardzo do serca, napalić się na coś
Entered by: *eva*
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15:50 Nov 7, 2003
English to Polish translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: kumbaya
"Maybe if I had my own affirmation elf, I'd be all Kumbaya like he is"
(American English, everyday conversation)
Michał Madaliński
Local time: 01:11
wziąć sobie coś bardzo do serca, napalić się na coś
Explanation:
proszę bardzo:

kumbaya(h) - From the song: "someone's cryin' Lord, kumbaya, Oh, Lord, kumbaya... Literally, "Come by here, Lord." Used in this context as the quality of taking something very much to heart. here, something is needed.

e.g., George didn't think much of the sermon but Randy was all kumbaya about it.

:o)

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Note added at 22 hrs 8 mins (2003-11-08 13:59:42 GMT)
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myślę, ze raczej: natchniony, niz: swiety wynika z kontekstu... ;o)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days 7 hrs 32 mins (2003-11-10 23:23:44 GMT) Post-grading
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bardzo dziekuję! :o)
Selected response from:

*eva*
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:11
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3wziąć sobie coś bardzo do serca, napalić się na coś
*eva*
4cały happyWitold Raczynski
3świętyRoman Palewicz
3come by here - wpadnij tutaj
bartek


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
come by here - wpadnij tutaj


Explanation:
Oh Lord, kumbaya. Also spelled kum ba yah, cumbayah, kumbayah, and probably a few other ways. If you look in a good songbook you'll find the word helpfully translated as "come by here," with the note that the song is "from Angola, Africa." The "come by here" part I'll buy. But Angola? Someone's doubtin', Lord, for the obvious reason that kumbaya is way too close to English to have a strictly African origin. More likely, I told my assistant Jane, it comes from some African-English pidgin or creole--that is, a combination of languages. (A pidgin is a linguistic makeshift that enables two cultures to communicate for purposes of trade, etc.; a creole is a pidgin that has become a culture's primary language.) Sure enough, when we look into the matter, we find this conjecture is on the money. Someone's grinnin', Lord, kumbaya.

Kumbaya apparently originated with the Gullah, an African-American people living on the Sea Islands and adjacent coastal regions of South Carolina and Georgia. (The best known Sea Island is Hilton Head, the resort area.) Having lived in isolation for hundreds of years, the Gullah speak a dialect that most native speakers of English find unintelligible on first hearing but that turns out to be heavily accented English with other stuff mixed in. The dialect appears in Joel Chandler Harris's "Uncle Remus" stories, to give you an idea what it sounds like. In the 1940s the pioneering linguist Lorenzo Turner showed that the Gullah language was actually a creole consisting of English plus a lot of words and constructions from the languages of west Africa, the Gullahs' homeland. Although long scorned as an ignorant caricature of English, Gullah is actually a language of considerable charm, with expressions like (forgive my poor attempt at expressing these phonetically) deh clin, dawn (literally "day clean"); troot mout, truthful person ("truth mouth"), and tebble tappuh, preacher ("table tapper").

And of course there's kumbayah. According to ethnomusicologist Thomas Miller, the song we know began as a Gullah spiritual. Some recordings of it were made in the 1920s, but no doubt it goes back earlier. Published versions began appearing in the 1930s. It's believed an American missionary couple taught the song to the locals in Angola, where its origins were forgotten. The song was then rediscovered in Angola and brought back here in time for the folksinging revival of the 50s and 60s. People might have thought the Gullahs talked funny, but we owe them a vote of thanks. Can you imagine sitting around the campfire singing, "Oh, Lord, come by here"?
http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a980911a.html

bartek
Local time: 01:11
Native speaker of: Polish
PRO pts in pair: 24743
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The asker has declined this answer

19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
święty


Explanation:
"byłbym równie święty jak on"
Tak by wynikało z kontekstu. Można trochę podkolorować (świętojebliwy)

Roman Palewicz
Poland
Local time: 01:11
PRO pts in pair: 298
Grading comment
No sources
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: No sources

53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
wziąć sobie coś bardzo do serca, napalić się na coś


Explanation:
proszę bardzo:

kumbaya(h) - From the song: "someone's cryin' Lord, kumbaya, Oh, Lord, kumbaya... Literally, "Come by here, Lord." Used in this context as the quality of taking something very much to heart. here, something is needed.

e.g., George didn't think much of the sermon but Randy was all kumbaya about it.

:o)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs 8 mins (2003-11-08 13:59:42 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

myślę, ze raczej: natchniony, niz: swiety wynika z kontekstu... ;o)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days 7 hrs 32 mins (2003-11-10 23:23:44 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

bardzo dziekuję! :o)


    Reference: http://www.pseudodictionary.com/search.php?letter=k&browsest...
*eva*
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in pair: 1113

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hanna Stochnialek
2 hrs
  -> dzięki :o)

agree  Janina Nowrot
3 hrs
  -> bardzo dziękuję :o)

agree  xxxgracee
8 hrs
  -> dziękuję! :o)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cały happy


Explanation:
to be Kumbaya to tyle co być szczęśliwym (am.blk Eng) tyle że z użyciem obcego słowa, coś jak u nas być cały happy

Witold Raczynski
Poland
Local time: 01:11
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in pair: 124
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