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parda

English translation: black

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12:31 Mar 12, 2008
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Certificates, Diplomas, Licenses, CVs
Portuguese term or phrase: parda
This is used in Brazilian birth documents to describe the "colour" of a person
Maria Jose Harty
Australia
Local time: 03:45
English translation:black
Explanation:
Although strictly speaking not correct (in Brazil there is a distinction between "pardo" and "preto" in this respect) this would be the term used in English, where such a distinction is not made.

The most accurate terms would be "half-caste" or "coloured" but Oxford marks both of these as offensive - so "black" is the safest option here.

Selected response from:

Paul Dixon
Brazil
Local time: 15:15
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5brownrhandler
5BROWN
Denise Monteiro de Souza
4coloured / colored
R-i-c-h-a-r-d
4medium brown
Zornitsa Antonova
4black
Paul Dixon


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
black


Explanation:
Although strictly speaking not correct (in Brazil there is a distinction between "pardo" and "preto" in this respect) this would be the term used in English, where such a distinction is not made.

The most accurate terms would be "half-caste" or "coloured" but Oxford marks both of these as offensive - so "black" is the safest option here.



Paul Dixon
Brazil
Local time: 15:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 47
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, I was reluctant to add "blacK" because I think the person must be "mestica" ( my cedilha is a non event, apologies). Thank you

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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
brown


Explanation:
If someone is half white and half black, it's not correct to classify that person b;ack or white. Therefore, "brown" is a more accurate term. It's not a matter of language, but country culture. Therefore, I suggest that you add a note to explain this.

rhandler
Local time: 15:15
Native speaker of: Portuguese
PRO pts in category: 203
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you to all for your very informative help


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gustavo Silva: concordo plenamente :-)
54 mins
  -> Obrigado, windblast!

agree  Katarina Peters
1 hr
  -> Obrigado, Katarina!

agree  Adi Brock: Definitely. It means "mestiço" it's not " black"
2 hrs
  -> Obrigado, Adi, mas a escolha (a pior possível) já foi feita! Qualquer outra seria melhor, mas ...

agree  Donna Sandin: it absolutely has to be BROWN. "black" would be "preto," makes a big diff in Brazil. Maybe in US he/she would be referred to as black but you will offend a Brazilian if you translate parda as black
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Donna! Imagine in Australia, where the question came from: the local native are not black, but brown!

agree  Humberto Ribas
15 days
  -> Obrigado, Humberto.
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
medium brown


Explanation:
also an option

Zornitsa Antonova
Brazil
Local time: 15:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
coloured / colored


Explanation:
I suggest, just to be politically correct, that you do not refer to any specific colour. It's considered racist in some areas, plus it gets rather complicated when trying to describe different 'shades'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2008-03-12 14:50:32 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Dear Sr. Jose.
The answer is certainly not 'black', I can assure you. 'Black' refers to Negro people, i.e. people of African origin, not people of mixed-race or 'mestiça' or 'half-cast' or 'mixed-blood' or 'coloured' or 'BROWN', as per Ralph Handler's answer.

Here are various dictionary definitions:

par.do1
adj (lat pardu) 1 De cor entre branco e preto. 2 Branco-sujo. 3 Bot Marrom castanho: Algas pardas. sm V mulato. P.-avermelhado: de cor parda tendente para o vermelho. Pl: pardo-avermelhados. P. de cobalto, Quím: óxido de cobalto. P. de cromo, Quím: cromato de cobre. P. de Marte, Quím: óxido de ferro e albumina. P. de ocre, Quím: óxido férrico. P.-doce: variedade de maçã. P. inglês, Quím: pardo de ocre. P.-mato: variedade de maçã. P.-negro: de cor parda tendente para o negro. Pl: pardo-negros. P.-violeta: que participa do pardo e da cor da violeta.

Britannica:
pardo

(Spanish; "brown")

In Venezuela, a person of mixed African, European, and Indian ancestry.

In the colonial period, pardos, like all nonwhites, were kept in a state of servitude, with no hope of gaining wealth or political power. Nevertheless, most pardos remained royalists during much of the war for independence because they relied on Spain for protection in their conflicts with the Venezuelan-born whites, toward whom the European Spaniards took a superior attitude. In Brazil a pardo is a person of mixed European and African descent.

Pardo: IS A PERSON OF M I X E D EUROPEAN AND AFRICAN DECENT.

Vox (Spanish):
pardo
adjetivo
1 (color tierra) brown
2 (sin luz) dark, dim

R-i-c-h-a-r-d
Brazil
Local time: 15:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 34
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you- I prefer not to omit any particular from a document but I appreciate your valuable comment

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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
BROWN


Explanation:
The Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) classifies the Brazilian population in five categories: white, black, pardo (brown), yellow or Indigenous, based on skin color.

White (49.9% of the population):[2] usually a Brazilian of full or predominant European ancestry or other White ancestry (such as Arab Brazilian, Jewish) who considers himself or herself to be White.
Pardo or Brown (43.2%):[2] usually a Multiracial Brazilian of brown skin color and mixed-race features who considers himself or herself to be "Pardo".
Black (6.3%):[2] usually a dark-skinned Brazilian of Black African ancestry who considers himself or herself to be Black.
Yellow: (0.5%) usually a Brazilian of East Asian descent, mostly Japanese.
Indigenous (0.4%):[3] usually a Brazilian of full or predominant Amerindian ancestry who considers himself or herself to be Amerindian.



    Reference: http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pardo_(cor)
    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_groups_in_Brazil
Denise Monteiro de Souza
Brazil
Local time: 15:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
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