keep en korrel

English translation: notch and bead

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:keep en korrel
English translation:notch and bead
Entered by: George Thomson

10:19 Apr 7, 2005
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime
Dutch term or phrase: keep en korrel
Concerning gun sights:
'voorzien van keep en korrel'
I think it's to do with the notch on a rifle and the little ball or pin at the end of the barrel which you line up with the target.
But what's it called in English?
George Thomson
Local time: 05:32
notch and bead
Explanation:
I think you can use the van Dale translations here (and from van Dale I now know the origin of the expression 'draw a bead on').

See also:

Sights - The aiming device on a firearm. On most rifles and handguns, the factory-installed sights consist of two elements called "front sight" and "rear sight," which together frequently are called "iron sights" because they are made up of principally metal. The front sight, located on the barrel near the muzzle, is usually post-shaped or bead-shaped and hence sometimes called post or bead. The rear sight is usually located partway down the barrel, near the breech or on the receiver. If it consists of a V- or U-shaped notch in a flat piece of metal, it is called an "open" sight. An open sight with a deep U-shaped notch with protruding wings is called a "buckhorn sight." The rear sight can also consist of an aperture in a disk. It is then called an aperture, or peep, sight. When the aperture sight is attached to the receiver it is called a "receiver sight" and when it is attached to the tang it is called a "tang sight." When the aperture adjustments have micrometer settings, such a sight is cometimes called a "micrometer sight." A hunting shotgun usually has only one sight consisting of a bead near the muzzle, but most trap and skeet guns have a second bead halfway down the barrel. There are also telescopic sights for rifles and handguns.
http://www.myoan.net/hunting/jargon.html
Selected response from:

Ken Cox
Local time: 05:32
Grading comment
Many thansk for your extensive and very helpful answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1notch and (front) sight
Steven Mertens
3 +1notch and bead
Ken Cox


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
notch and bead


Explanation:
I think you can use the van Dale translations here (and from van Dale I now know the origin of the expression 'draw a bead on').

See also:

Sights - The aiming device on a firearm. On most rifles and handguns, the factory-installed sights consist of two elements called "front sight" and "rear sight," which together frequently are called "iron sights" because they are made up of principally metal. The front sight, located on the barrel near the muzzle, is usually post-shaped or bead-shaped and hence sometimes called post or bead. The rear sight is usually located partway down the barrel, near the breech or on the receiver. If it consists of a V- or U-shaped notch in a flat piece of metal, it is called an "open" sight. An open sight with a deep U-shaped notch with protruding wings is called a "buckhorn sight." The rear sight can also consist of an aperture in a disk. It is then called an aperture, or peep, sight. When the aperture sight is attached to the receiver it is called a "receiver sight" and when it is attached to the tang it is called a "tang sight." When the aperture adjustments have micrometer settings, such a sight is cometimes called a "micrometer sight." A hunting shotgun usually has only one sight consisting of a bead near the muzzle, but most trap and skeet guns have a second bead halfway down the barrel. There are also telescopic sights for rifles and handguns.
http://www.myoan.net/hunting/jargon.html

Ken Cox
Local time: 05:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Many thansk for your extensive and very helpful answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lawyer-Linguist
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
notch and (front) sight


Explanation:
see amongst others http://216.239.59.104/search?q=cache:_FK0lC6K12YJ:www.samcog...

good luck

Steven

Steven Mertens
Local time: 05:32
Native speaker of: Native in FlemishFlemish, Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Siobhan Schoonhoff-Reilly
6 hrs
  -> thanks Siobhan
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