KudoZ home » English » Architecture

spire/turret/?

English translation: spire-steeple

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:spire/turret/?
English translation:spire-steeple
Entered by: Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

21:08 Dec 9, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Architecture / ...a cross or a figure
English term or phrase: spire/turret/?
Is there a general term denoting the various types of structures which crown steeples, towers etc. (usually of churches, from Gothic to Rococo, but also town hall towers), and look like combined spire+lantern+dome or cupola+orb etc. (not all of them necessarily), sometimes topped by a cross of a figure, decorated with pinnacles etc., frequently faced with copper or tiles?
The Baroque structure of this type in Germany is called "Welsche Haube". This type of structure crowns for ex. S. Ivo and S. Agnese in Rome, or St. Mary-le-Bow in London. The closest I could find was a "spire-like form" (Britannica), but this is far from satisfactory...
Barbara Gadomska
Local time: 09:41
Spire-Steeple
Explanation:
This would probably be closest as you've given so many possibilities. This is found in the Shorter Oxford Dictionary, and used in relation to churches.
Otherwise start with Spire-Steeple then describe "orb-shaped with a cross" seperately.
Turret is not really appropriate.
Good luck. Architecture is interesting.
Selected response from:

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 09:41
Grading comment
I think this type of roof topping is mostly German, but it spread all over Europe. Haven't been able to find any French examples, though. Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4Spire-SteepleAnna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
3See comment below...
Tony M
3finialDr Sue Levy


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Spire-Steeple


Explanation:
This would probably be closest as you've given so many possibilities. This is found in the Shorter Oxford Dictionary, and used in relation to churches.
Otherwise start with Spire-Steeple then describe "orb-shaped with a cross" seperately.
Turret is not really appropriate.
Good luck. Architecture is interesting.

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com
France
Local time: 09:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
I think this type of roof topping is mostly German, but it spread all over Europe. Haven't been able to find any French examples, though. Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
finial


Explanation:
that's the decorative bit at the top

http://www.denninger.com/whatisf.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 51 mins (2004-12-09 21:59:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the spire is a pointed structure

http://lucky.phpwebhosting.com/~ah/a/DCTNRY/s/spire.html

helful dictionary by the way
doesn\'t seem to be a collective word for tower-toppings :-)

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 09:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
See comment below...


Explanation:
Well, I don't actually think there IS one single word that means all that.

A steeple is a steeply-pointed roof (usually on a church), a spire is even taller and more pointed (but might also relate to non-church buildings)

A turret is something quite different - a small, sometimes jutting-out mini-tower, shape of roof not specified, but often conical / pointed

As for all the others, I think you have to refer to them as various kinds of 'roof', with suitable specifying words...

But I'm no expert, so stand to be corrected...


Tony M
France
Local time: 09:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search