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Quaerendo Invenietis

English translation: You'll find it if you look for it.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Quaerendo Invenietis
English translation:You'll find it if you look for it.
Entered by: David Wigtil
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09:58 Jun 4, 2002
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Quaerendo Invenietis
not sure if they are Italian or something else.
Yubing YANG
You'll find it if you look for it.
Explanation:
This has the false appearance of being from the Gospel of Matthew, ch. 7 -- the section called the "Sermon on the Mount." The Latin translation of the original Greek of the equivalent phrase there is actually, "quaerite et invenietis," rendered traditionally in English as, "seek and ye shall find."

The grammar of the Latin phrase you offer is different from "quaerite et invenietis." Instead of the imperative (command) form, QUAERITE, joined with ET ("and") to the main future-tense verb, your sentence shows QUAERENDO, "By seeking; If you seek".

But "seek" is becoming rather archaic in ordinary conversation, and "ye" fell out of conversational use about 350 years ago. Latin also commonly omits direct-object pronouns, just as it usually omits subject pronouns. So I've tried to use up-to-date ordinary English in my rendition, replete with object pronouns.

--Loquamur

Selected response from:

David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 04:25
Grading comment
All professionals here are helpful and kind. I feel sorry I can only award one Kudoz.

Many thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5seek and ye shall find
Fernando Muela
5 +1You'll find it if you look for it.
David Wigtil


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
seek and ye shall find


Explanation:
It's Latin, not Italian. See the links below.
Good luck!

Ten Canons of the Musical Offering - [ Traduzca esta página ]
... In this canon and the next Bach does not indicate the time interval, inviting
us to search for it ourselves--Quaerendo invenietis "Seek and ye shall find ...
jan.ucc.nau.edu/~tas3/musoffcanons.html - 11k - En caché - Páginas similares

whtsaric.html - [ Traduzca esta página ]
... The performer is left to puzzle out the solutions to two of the canons, one of
which bears the notation "quaerendo invenietis", "seek and ye shall find.". ...
ricercar.com/whtsaric.html - 4k - En caché - Páginas similares


Fernando Muela
Spain
Local time: 10:25
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francesco D'Alessandro
1 min

agree  Gian
18 mins

agree  Hege Jakobsen Lepri
21 mins

agree  Elisabeth Ghysels
21 mins

agree  Vittorio Felaco
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You'll find it if you look for it.


Explanation:
This has the false appearance of being from the Gospel of Matthew, ch. 7 -- the section called the "Sermon on the Mount." The Latin translation of the original Greek of the equivalent phrase there is actually, "quaerite et invenietis," rendered traditionally in English as, "seek and ye shall find."

The grammar of the Latin phrase you offer is different from "quaerite et invenietis." Instead of the imperative (command) form, QUAERITE, joined with ET ("and") to the main future-tense verb, your sentence shows QUAERENDO, "By seeking; If you seek".

But "seek" is becoming rather archaic in ordinary conversation, and "ye" fell out of conversational use about 350 years ago. Latin also commonly omits direct-object pronouns, just as it usually omits subject pronouns. So I've tried to use up-to-date ordinary English in my rendition, replete with object pronouns.

--Loquamur



David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 04:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 19
Grading comment
All professionals here are helpful and kind. I feel sorry I can only award one Kudoz.

Many thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
161 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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