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transite tongue

English translation: transitional language

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11:09 Feb 6, 2018
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - History
English term or phrase: transite tongue
Thin sheets of crystal paper lay scattered across the surface, leaving only glimpses of the wood grain underneath. Fine printing covered some of the paper. Idaho recognized words in Galach and four other languages, including the rare *transite tongue* of Perth.
--quoted from the God Emperor of Dune (1981, science fiction) by Frank Herbert (link: https://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks&ei=wIp5WqGeM4mnsgHd_rB...

Galach is a fictional language, and Perth seems a fictional planet.
I only found "transite" as a brand for a line of asbestos-cement products which doesn't fit here apparently. Is it possible a typo for "transit" (so "transit tongue" means "transitional/temporary language")?
Thank you!
updownK
China
Local time: 18:28
English translation:transitional language
Explanation:
once again I think this is a coined word which suggests, as you say "transitional" or transit. I thought at first that this is possibly a bridging language between other languages but it's "rare" so perhaps not. So, is it rare becuse it is in the process of transition from one form to another?
I think if you can coin something with transit or transitional, an "in-betweenness", in it that should be OK.

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Note added at 36 mins (2018-02-06 11:45:57 GMT)
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Another thought. Perth is a city in Scotland (besides being a major city in Australia as well). Gallach suggests the language of Scotland (and Ireland) of Gàidhlig so I'm sure these coined words are all intended to suggest actual words.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Gaelic

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Note added at 1 day 35 mins (2018-02-07 11:44:23 GMT) Post-grading
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Glad to help. Yes, you can only make informed guesses based on the context and any clues given.
I know when I read this series of books years ago I didn't look up any meanings of words in dictionaries as I knew they were not real words but just suggestive of actual words.
Selected response from:

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 11:28
Grading comment
Thank you for your answer and the background you gave! It's possible either between other languages or different forms, because of no further context.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1transitional language
Yvonne Gallagher


  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
transitional language


Explanation:
once again I think this is a coined word which suggests, as you say "transitional" or transit. I thought at first that this is possibly a bridging language between other languages but it's "rare" so perhaps not. So, is it rare becuse it is in the process of transition from one form to another?
I think if you can coin something with transit or transitional, an "in-betweenness", in it that should be OK.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 36 mins (2018-02-06 11:45:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another thought. Perth is a city in Scotland (besides being a major city in Australia as well). Gallach suggests the language of Scotland (and Ireland) of Gàidhlig so I'm sure these coined words are all intended to suggest actual words.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Gaelic

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 35 mins (2018-02-07 11:44:23 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Glad to help. Yes, you can only make informed guesses based on the context and any clues given.
I know when I read this series of books years ago I didn't look up any meanings of words in dictionaries as I knew they were not real words but just suggestive of actual words.

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 11:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Thank you for your answer and the background you gave! It's possible either between other languages or different forms, because of no further context.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch
9 mins
  -> Thanks:-)
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