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French Canadian Label Translations
Thread poster: Susanne Evens

Susanne Evens
United States
Local time: 11:36
German to English
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Feb 2, 2004

On food label localizations into French Canadian, do both English and French Canadian languages have to shown on the label or just French Canadian?
Does anybody have any insight into the translation of food labels including the listing of the ingredients in both languages?


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xxx00000000
English to French
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Ask the client Feb 2, 2004



[Edited at 2004-02-03 02:34]


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PB Trans

Local time: 17:36
French to English
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Both Feb 2, 2004

SHendry wrote:

On food label localizations into French Canadian, do both English and French Canadian languages have to shown on the label or just French Canadian?
Does anybody have any insight into the translation of food labels including the listing of the ingredients in both languages?


Food labels always include both French and English (in all provinces). Ingredients must also be listed in both French and English.

[Edited at 2004-02-03 00:38]


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Local time: 17:36
French to English
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Canadian Food Inspection Agency Feb 2, 2004

Just to add to my previous post, there are some exceptions for bilingual labelling, but I'm not sure they would apply to you. You can get complete info here:

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency site:
2003 Guide to Food Labelling and Advertising
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/guide/toce.shtml

Bilingual requirements here:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/guide/ch2e.shtml#2.4


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cheungmo
English to French
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Yes Feb 3, 2004

The question: ...do both English and French [...] languages have to shown on the label or just French Canadian?

Both. French Canadian, by the way, is not a *language*.

Does anybody have any insight into the translation of food labels including the listing of the ingredients in both languages?

Ingredients must be listed in both languages. Nutritional information is usually shown (in both languages) as well.

Here's what's required in both languages:

"Label" means any label, mark, sign, device, imprint, stamp, brand, ticket or tag

All prepackaged products require a label with the following exceptions:

One-bite confections, such as a candy or a stick of chewing gum, sold individually;
and
Fresh fruits or vegetables packaged in a wrapper or confining band of less than 1/2 inch (12.7 mm).

All mandatory information on food labels must be shown in both official languages, i.e., French and English, with one exception:

The identity and principal place of business of the person by or for whom the prepackaged product was manufactured, processed, produced or packaged for resale, may be in either English or French.

In addition, all information on the labels of the following may be in one official language only:

Shipping containers that are not offered for sale to consumers;
Local products sold in a local area in which one of the official languages [i.e. English and French] is the mother tongue of less than 10 percent of the residents;
Official test market products (see 2.15, Test Market Foods);
and
Specialty foods, as defined by the Food and Drug Regulations.


The province of Quebec has additional requirements concerning the use of the French language on all products marketed within its jurisdiction.

Information on these requirements can be obtained from:

Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec
200-A Chemin Sainte-Foy
Québec, Québec G1R 4X6
Tel. (418) 643-2500
Fax (418) 644-3049

[You can also check out the Website of l'Office de la langue française: http://www.olf.gouv.qc.ca/]


The Requirements
The common name of a food is:
The name prescribed by the FDR, e.g., "orange juice from concentrate", "60% whole wheat bread", "milk chocolate", "mayonnaise";
or
The name prescribed by any other federal regulation, e.g., mixed vegetables, breakfast sausage;
or
When not prescribed by regulation, the name by which the food is commonly known, e.g., orange drink, vanilla cookies, chocolate cake.

The common name must be shown on the principal display panel of the food label (i.e., main panel) in both French and English, with a minimum type height of 1.6 mm (1/16 inch), based on the lowercase letter "o".
[You can trust a goverment to use a system no one uses. It would have been easier to specify a font size... ]



You'll find fairly complete information (and where the above is drawn from) at:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/guide/ch2e.shtml

The rest of the regulations are here:
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/fssa/labeti/guide/tab2e.shtml


HTH


Pierre


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