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near

English translation: almost

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:near
English translation:almost
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15:05 Aug 4, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / British English - CV
English term or phrase: near
as in 'near fluent' when talking about knowledge of a foreign language. Is 'near' OK in such an instance or would you choose another word?

I know that people say 'near native', but am not sure about 'near fluent'...?
Miroslawa Jodlowiec
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:20
almost / virtually
Explanation:
I would say "almost fluent" or "virtually fluent" - the second one is closer to perfection
Selected response from:

xxxIanW
Local time: 07:20
Grading comment
I would like to thank all who answered my question, especially Kim, David and Armorel. Unfortunately, I will go for the 'almost fluent' as described in the application pack. Although, it is not my favourite expression here, as it does not properly describe someone's knowledge of a foreign language (as you all have demonstrated it on the below mentioned examples). Thank you ALL very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7almost / virtuallyxxxIanW
4 +3near-native fluency
Kim Metzger
5mention an exam you passed, with grade
Paul Dixon
4good, excellent
Armorel Young
3leave it outDavid Moore
3almost fluent
Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
almost / virtually


Explanation:
I would say "almost fluent" or "virtually fluent" - the second one is closer to perfection

xxxIanW
Local time: 07:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
I would like to thank all who answered my question, especially Kim, David and Armorel. Unfortunately, I will go for the 'almost fluent' as described in the application pack. Although, it is not my favourite expression here, as it does not properly describe someone's knowledge of a foreign language (as you all have demonstrated it on the below mentioned examples). Thank you ALL very much!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
30 mins

agree  Eva Karpouzi
7 hrs

agree  eccotraduttrice
9 hrs

agree  Ramesh Madhavan
10 hrs

agree  Lizandra da Silva
21 hrs

agree  Jacqueline McKay
1 day23 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
9 days
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
almost fluent


Explanation:
How about almost fluent?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2004-08-04 15:14:42 GMT)
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Well, google search for \"near fluent\" got 1540 hits, \"almost fluent\" got 1650 hits and \"virtually fluent\" got 100 hits.
So, you can use either \"near fluent\" or \"almost fluent.\"

Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
Bangladesh
Local time: 11:20
Native speaker of: Native in BengaliBengali
PRO pts in category: 4
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
near-native fluency


Explanation:
Another possibility.

Monterey Institute of International Studies
Instructors:
All instructors have native or near-native fluency and experience with the methodology of intensive language learning.
http://www.miis.edu/lang-ilp-langs-russian.html


Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 00:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 187

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kurt Porter
59 mins

agree  chopra_2002
1 hr

agree  humbird
9 hrs

neutral  sylvie malich: Comment: This is interesting, I would qualify someone who speaks the language as a native but is not a native to have near-native fluency. However, the fact is that the person describes themself as being "near fluent" tells me that he/she is not.
1 day21 mins
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
leave it out


Explanation:
MIGHT be the best answer. To qualify fluency, which means the ability to speak (and be understood!) and understand other speakers in a language not your own rather tends to devalue your "fluency". I do agree there are grades of fluency but I feel that in a CV the expressions "outstanding/excellent/very good/ good" might go down better.

David Moore
Local time: 07:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
mention an exam you passed, with grade


Explanation:
I would say that grammatically you should say "nearly fluent" rather than "near fluent". On the whole, as the concept of "nearly fluent" is somewhat subjective, I would prefer something like: Proficiency level English. passed with distinction. This would be an equivalent to "nearly fluent".
Another option in use in Brazil is "native-like" but I would not use it here, as I take this to mean someone with native fluency but not actually a native speaker.

Paul Dixon
Brazil
Local time: 02:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 5

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  cjperera: native-like? how strange!
5 mins
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
good, excellent


Explanation:
Why not just say that you speak good French (or whatever) - or excellent French, if you want to impress even more. To me, fluent is a dodgy term to use - as others have said, it is hard to tell exactly what it means. Is fluent supposed to mean that you can barely be distinguished from a native speaker (that would be the near-native fluency that has been proposed), or simply that you can speak it well enough to manage fine for all practical purposes? If one takes the second interpretation (as some people will if you use the term), then "almost fluent" could be interpreted as somewhat disparaging and not particularly good. Rather than say something with slightly negative connotations ("not good enough to be fluent"), it would be better to say something entirely positive, which is why I suggest good or excellent.

Armorel Young
Local time: 06:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 52
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