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tu che

English translation: point taken ("you got me there")

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05:13 Feb 1, 2004
French to English translations [Non-PRO]
French term or phrase: tu che
I think this is a Frenc term. What is the meaning in English?
English translation:point taken ("you got me there")
Explanation:
One way to put it. Actually "touché", a fencing expression, a call made when one gets hit by the opponent. It's a way to acknowledge a point, a witty remark or an accusation. In this neck of the woods people also say "busted!".
Cheers
P :-)

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Note added at 24 mins (2004-02-01 05:38:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

... oops, not so fast Paulie, I showed too much confidence actually. It could well be something else, of course. Please take my confidence level a notch down and read it as just an option. P :-)
Selected response from:

xxxPaul Roige
Spain
Local time: 23:59
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +11point taken ("you got me there")xxxPaul Roige
3 +10You who
athena22
5It's RussianxxxAlex Zelkind
4touché
Nancy Bonnefond
4what are YOU lookin' at?piano
1 +1-
Isabelle Buffard
1 +1tuque
NancyLynn


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
It's Russian


Explanation:
"Ty che?"

It might have two meanings:

What ya want?
What's wrong with you?


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Note added at 2004-02-01 05:45:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Of course it might not be Russian :)

xxxAlex Zelkind
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 31
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
point taken ("you got me there")


Explanation:
One way to put it. Actually "touché", a fencing expression, a call made when one gets hit by the opponent. It's a way to acknowledge a point, a witty remark or an accusation. In this neck of the woods people also say "busted!".
Cheers
P :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2004-02-01 05:38:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

... oops, not so fast Paulie, I showed too much confidence actually. It could well be something else, of course. Please take my confidence level a notch down and read it as just an option. P :-)

xxxPaul Roige
Spain
Local time: 23:59
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in CatalanCatalan
PRO pts in pair: 29
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valentini Mellas: Indeed if there is no other context it could be Russian, Italian, French .. heck it could even be Greek :)
2 hrs
  -> even Spanish, (¿Tú qué?: sort of 'what about you?' :-))

agree  Isabelle Buffard: yeah, that would make sense, touché, plus I have noticed that Englishspeaking people like to use this word in their own language.
3 hrs
  -> ... but only the fair and humble!! :-) :-)

agree  rene_teews: I concurr with eirinn, though praticing fencing myself I hear the noun "touche" more often than the past participe but you got the idea :-)
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Rene, great to learn that, I wouldn't have known! Who put that accent there then when the word was imported, I wonder? :-)

agree  writeaway: either this or the Italian
7 hrs
  -> Italian is gaining ground for me :-)

agree  Amy Williams: with writeaway
7 hrs
  -> Italian is gaining ground for me :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
7 hrs

neutral  Laurel Porter: english-speaking people still spell it "touche"
8 hrs
  -> Please check Oxford dictionary... and Collins, and... but I agree many people don't bother, that's OK :-)

agree  margaret caulfield: touch'e
8 hrs

neutral  athena22: See Laurel's comment. Sorry, but my Collins, American Heritage, and also dictionary.com spell this with "ou" and not just "u" :-)
11 hrs
  -> See reply to Laurel :-)

agree  NancyLynn: or tuque, if Canadian French ;-)) betcha didn't even think o' that, eh?? :-)
11 hrs
  -> Rats, didn't!! Post it, Nancy, it could well be it! :-)

agree  Lesley Clarke: I agree, You got me there! and as an English-speaker I write it and say it touché
14 hrs
  -> I'm starting to feel sorry for the poster though if s/he's got no context available at all... :-)

agree  xxxsarahl: or it could be Spanish: tu Che (Guevara)
17 hrs
  -> Ah, el Che... this is getting interesting! :-)

agree  Nancy Bonnefond: Touché! Apparently the asker (anonymous BTW) doesn't know how it spells. Might have heard it somewhere, and wanting to know what it means he just wrote it as he heard it
1 day3 hrs
  -> Ice hockeyfencing KudoCup news: France 11 - Italia 9. Final quarter of the match-after France's powerful start, Italy's now finishing strong and singing-France now tired, confused and grossly misspelt. No streakers so far :-) :-)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +10
You who


Explanation:
I think this is Italian and not French. "Tu" is second person singular meaning "you" and "che" means who.

Incidentally, there is a famous soprano aria from Turandot, an opera by Puccini. The aria begins "Tu che di gel sei cinta" (very, very roughly, "You who are so icy").

athena22
Local time: 14:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valentini Mellas: Indeed if there is no other context it could be Russian, Italian, French .. heck it could even be Greek :)
24 mins

agree  Lyne: That's what I first thought when I saw 'tu che' : italian
3 hrs

agree  writeaway
4 hrs

agree  Laurel Porter: without context, this is the only possibility (so far) that makes sense - the other suggestions involve changing the spelling
6 hrs

agree  perke: I also thought for the first time that it is Italian.
6 hrs

agree  lien: I thought italian too
9 hrs

agree  xxxPaul Roige: if well spelt by asker, you got it :-) :-)
10 hrs

agree  NancyLynn: it was my first thought, till the asker mentioned French
11 hrs

agree  Giulia Barontini: It is ITALIAN!!!
16 hrs

agree  CHE124
9 days
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
-


Explanation:
maybe it's the written prununciation of someone not speaking french properly, like
tu che pas ? tu chais quoi !
Or maybe it's SMS style, but we can suppose a lot of things without context

Seriously now, I would tend too to think that it's Italien, Google displays a lot of Italian sites if you type this in.

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Note added at 3 hrs 41 mins (2004-02-01 08:55:08 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thinking about it, I think that Paul may have found the solution with touché.

Isabelle Buffard
France
Local time: 23:59
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 47

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxsarahl: tu es auvergnate ?
15 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
touché


Explanation:
maybe an english speaking person saying "touché", meaning "good point!", "exact!".

Nancy Bonnefond
France
Local time: 23:59
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Laurel Porter: but we english-speaking people spell it "touche"! (...and it's "exactLY")
2 hrs
  -> Apparently the asker (anonymous BTW) doesn't know how it spells. Might have heard it somewhere, and wanting to know what it means he just wrote it according to the pronunciation. I agree though that people who KNOW the word spell it correctly
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
tuque


Explanation:
In response to Paul's tongue-in-cheek suggestion, I offer this term only because you never know... this may be what you're looking for, esp. this time of year :-)
What does Y2K stand for ? We all remember that.
What does MY2K stand for ?
In Canada, it's my tuque, eh ? Embroidered across the front flap of your woolly hat, this little acronym makes for conversation while waiting for the hockey game to start

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 17:59
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 715

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxPaul Roige: Ça chauffe au patinoire, Nancy!! Salut :-) :-)
3 hrs
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
what are YOU lookin' at?


Explanation:
(y) tu que?

This Spanish term can be used to challenge someone who is trying to butt into your business.

piano
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
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