Seltzer

English translation: soda (water) [UK]

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Seltzer (water) [US]
English translation:soda (water) [UK]
Entered by: Tony M

03:20 Nov 25, 2006
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / Popular
English term or phrase: Seltzer
I've seen the translation for seltzer to Portuguese and it's translated as a word that means "tonic water". Are seltzer and tonic water alike? Is seltzer bitter?
kseraph
soda (water)
Explanation:
Not really the same, no!

Seltzer is what we cal 'soda (water)' — not as in Coke etc., but as in whisky-and-soda — simply carbonated water, often out of a soda syphon.

As W/M says, 'tonic' is a specific carbonated drink that contains quinine and has a bitter flavour. For reference, this is often called 'schweppes' in FR, or simply 'tonic', of course!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:03
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +8similar
Will Matter
4 +3soda (water)
Tony M


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
seltzer
similar


Explanation:
They are similar but different. "Seltzer" is just carbonated water and "tonic water" has carbonation but it also contains quinine. Both are used as a 'mixer' when making drinks. 'Seltzer' isn't bitter but 'tonic water' is, because of the quinine. HTH.

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Note added at 8 mins (2006-11-25 03:28:40 GMT)
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonic_water


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonated_water
Will Matter
United States
Local time: 11:03
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  swisstell: cheers and have a Gin Tonic on me
32 mins
  -> Prost. ;0) Thanks for the 'agree'. How's life?

agree  RHELLER
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  Caryl Swift: An answer as crystal-clear as a mountain stream - what a tonic! :-)
3 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Maria Luisa Duarte
3 hrs
  -> Gracias.

agree  Mara Ballarini: My parents used to have sth like a cylinder with a seltzer aerosol they used to spray in their aperitiv - to make bubbles - so to say
4 hrs
  -> I know the thing that you mean. They used to have them in the UK also, I believe it was called a 'gasogene'. Sherlock Holmes reputedly had one. 'Mille grazie' for the 'agree'.

agree  Daniel Mencher
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, sir.

agree  Dave Calderhead
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, sir.

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
2 days 16 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
seltzer
soda (water)


Explanation:
Not really the same, no!

Seltzer is what we cal 'soda (water)' — not as in Coke etc., but as in whisky-and-soda — simply carbonated water, often out of a soda syphon.

As W/M says, 'tonic' is a specific carbonated drink that contains quinine and has a bitter flavour. For reference, this is often called 'schweppes' in FR, or simply 'tonic', of course!

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:03
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 285

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cmwilliams (X)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, CMW!

agree  Rachel Fell: tonic water has more than quinine in it http://www.foodfacts.com/members/item_info.cfm?id=12399
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Rcahel! Oh yes, indeed!

agree  zax
4 hrs
  -> Thanx, zax!
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