prêt d’un montant de X en principal

English translation: loan of X

08:31 May 1, 2018
French to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general)
French term or phrase: prêt d’un montant de X en principal
"la société XXX selon projet de fusion entre les deux sociétés approuvé par leurs conseils d’administration en date du 19 mars 2018, (ci-après dénommée « la Banque ») a accordé à Monsieur ZZZ et Madame YYY un prêt d’un montant de 100.000,00 € en principal."

How, if at all, do we incorporate that "en principal" into this? I'm tempted just to put "a loan in the amount of ...".
Mpoma
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:52
English translation:loan of X
Explanation:
The principal is the loan amount, so you don't need to mention it. The interest, if any, is calculated separately.

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Note added at 4 hrs (2018-05-01 12:57:52 GMT)
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If you really feel the need to mention principal, you can just say "with a principal of X". Amount is redundant.
Selected response from:

philgoddard
United States
Grading comment
Thanks ... in the end I put "loan in the amount of"... but the main point is that "principal" appears at best optional in English.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2loan of/in a principal amount of €X
Rob Grayson
4 +1loan of X
philgoddard
5loan amounting to X in principal
Robert Miki
4loan having a principal amount of X
Virginia Hamilton
4 -1In principle or principal?
Posted via ProZ.com Mobile
Mauriceh


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
loan of/in a principal amount of €X


Explanation:
Google "loan of a principal amount of" and you'll get somewhere north of 60,000 hits. Make it "loan in a principal amount of" and you get 90,000+ hits. Take your pick.

Rob Grayson
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 753
Notes to answerer
Asker: Redundancy is the question which concerns me; I should have mentioned that in the question. Sometimes such redundancy can be harmless, and you can just let it go as part of a "belt-and-braces" attitude. But sometimes redundancy can positively confuse: what is the difference, a reader might ask, between a "loan in the amount of X" and a "loan in a principal amount of X". I did do a Google search. Despite it announcing "93000" hits, actually there were only 3 pages and each hit clearly referred to a US context. I am translating (as I do by default) into "UK" or "international" English. I'm far from convinced this is so common in that case...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell
1 hr

agree  AllegroTrans: or 'principal sum of'
2 hrs
  -> Much less natural, IMHO. And "loan in the principal sum of…" gets – wait for it – ONE Google hit! :)

neutral  Robert Miki: - loan of/in a principal amount of €X - loan having a principal amount of X - loan amounting to X in principal Judge for yourself which is wordier
3 hrs

neutral  philgoddard: Just as sum is redundant, so is amount.
4 hrs
  -> As, in your opinion (mistaken IMHO), is "principal"…
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
loan having a principal amount of X


Explanation:
It is important to specify principal (to distinguish it from interest) - see explanations in web reference.

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Note added at 17 mins (2018-05-01 08:48:34 GMT)
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Sorry, I crossed with Rob's answer, which I of course endorse.


    https://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/principal.asp
Virginia Hamilton
France
Local time: 16:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
loan amounting to X in principal


Explanation:
That is business speak.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2018-05-01 11:57:14 GMT)
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- loan of/in a principal amount of €X
- loan having a principal amount of X
- loan amounting to X in principal

Judge for yourself which is wordier


    Reference: http://www.linguee.fr/francais-anglais/search?source=auto&qu...
Robert Miki
Cameroon
Local time: 15:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rob Grayson: Not a form of wording I've particularly encountered. And Linguee is not exactly a reliable source for native quality English. // Reword, to help you get the point: I have not seen this commonly used in this context (formal financial documents).
1 hr
  -> 2 amount /əˈmaʊnt/ verb: amounts; amounted; amounting amount to: [phr verb] 1. amount to (something): to produce (a total) when added together, e.g., -The bill amounted to 10 dollars. -They have debts amounting to thousands of dollars. (Meriam Webster)

neutral  AllegroTrans: too wordy
1 hr

neutral  Mauriceh: I agree with @Rob which is why I have given the answer I have given. It doesn't make sense to say "le montant de xx en principal" in that way. Faux amis in my view.
1 day 20 hrs
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
loan of X


Explanation:
The principal is the loan amount, so you don't need to mention it. The interest, if any, is calculated separately.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2018-05-01 12:57:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you really feel the need to mention principal, you can just say "with a principal of X". Amount is redundant.

philgoddard
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 194
Grading comment
Thanks ... in the end I put "loan in the amount of"... but the main point is that "principal" appears at best optional in English.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rob Grayson: The person who wrote this chose to specify that he/she was referring to the principal amount. It's not our job to edit that out. // Unless you know sth I don't, this isn't a transcript of someone going to a bank and asking for a loan.
13 mins
  -> It is our job to edit out redundancy. You don't go to a bank and ask for a loan with a principal of £500.//I didn't say it was. That was an example.

agree  AllegroTrans: I will agree with this too as it's frequently expressed this way
42 mins
  -> Thanks!
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1 day 21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
In principle or principal?


Explanation:
I am wondering if this document is saying that assuming that the merger takes place that a loan will be provided. On other worlds there is a contentent event that needs to happen (in principle). I say that because any basic financial person knows that a loan refers to capital and therefore to refer to interest is redundant (as Phil stated). Therefore the way it is used in your document is unusual as a classic loan document would say "un prêt d'un montant de" or "pour le montant de", etc. But I have never seen a loan document say "en principal". My view is there for that this referring to loan being contingent ie "en principal"

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Note added at 1 day 21 hrs (2018-05-03 06:11:15 GMT)
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I now see more information from @mpoma and that this loan was actually given and not contingent so what I say above is unlikely but not impossible. The context now is one of debt collection/baliffs, etc and therefore the world Principle is being in all likelihood used to refer to the original capital amount (so as to distinguish it no doubt from a raft of other charges).

Example sentence(s):
  • En principal si nous partons à, 9 heurs nous arriveront à temp. (principal is often shortened to "en principe" in common verbal usage)
Mauriceh
Switzerland
Local time: 16:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Rob Grayson: You are confusing "principal" and "principle". (And in French, "principal" and "principe".) They are entirely unrelated.
5 hrs
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