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Hoorig, hoorig hoorig

English translation: dialect version of "hairy"

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
German term or phrase:hoorig
English translation:dialect version of "hairy"
Entered by: Rusinterp
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14:22 Jan 7, 2002
German to English translations [PRO]
/ Something to do with purring cats?
German term or phrase: Hoorig, hoorig hoorig
Hoorig, hoorig hoorig isch die Katz - un wenn die Katz nit hoorig isch,
dann fängt sie keine Mäuse mehr

One of the colleagues quoted this phrase with a link to a site about some kind of fun German (I think) New Year celebration.
Rusinterp
Hairy, hairy, hairy is the cat, and if it isn't hairy, it doesn't catch any mice any more
Explanation:
It's Swiss German and it's a chant generally heard at Carnival times, I believe, in the Basel area. It's not a New Year celebration, it's "Fasnacht" in order to chase away the winter (traditionally).
Selected response from:

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 17:29
Grading comment
Thank you very much both for the answer and clarification. As I suspected, it was very funny.

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Hairy, hairy, hairy
Thomas Bollmann
4hairy, hairy, hairy
Alison Schwitzgebel
4Hairy, hairy, hairy is the cat, and if it isn't hairy, it doesn't catch any mice any moreKlaus Dorn


  

Answers


28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Hairy, hairy, hairy is the cat, and if it isn't hairy, it doesn't catch any mice any more


Explanation:
It's Swiss German and it's a chant generally heard at Carnival times, I believe, in the Basel area. It's not a New Year celebration, it's "Fasnacht" in order to chase away the winter (traditionally).

Klaus Dorn
Local time: 17:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 1514
Grading comment
Thank you very much both for the answer and clarification. As I suspected, it was very funny.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Alison Schwitzgebel: damn, you beat me by a minute!!!
3 mins
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
hairy, hairy, hairy


Explanation:
Hoorig is a dialect pronunciation of "haarig", which means hairy.

The cat is hairy, hairy, hairy,
And if the cat ain't hairy no more, then it ain't gonna cetch no more mice!

Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 15:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 3409
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Hairy, hairy, hairy


Explanation:
The translation of Klaus is perfectly right, there is nothing to add.
But it is not Swiss, it is Suebian, a dialect from the Soutwest of Germany. This call is from the "Fasnet" (the Suebian kind of "Karneval") from the town Meßkirch near the Lake of Constance.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-07 16:06:12 (GMT)
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sorry, it is not from Meßkirch, but from Stockach, a town near Meßkirch, you can see the whole text at www.fasnacht-stockach.de

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Note added at 2002-01-07 19:41:34 (GMT)
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the exact link is: www.fasnacht-stockach.de/neu02.html
but every non-Suebian has difficulties in understanding this funny little poem


    native born Suebian, impatiently waiting for the Fasnet
Thomas Bollmann
Germany
Local time: 15:29
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 92

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: Right you are, it is not Swiss.
3 hrs
  -> I heard it many times during "Fasnet" and I will hear it again soon. "'s gôht drgega", was heißen soll: die Fasnet steht vor der Tür.

agree  Kathi Stock
3 hrs
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