Pages in topic:   [1 2] >
Off topic: Cursive writing no longer taught in schools
Thread poster: LegalTransform

LegalTransform  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:08
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
Sep 7, 2010

Schools in the U.S. are no longer teaching cursive or script handwriting. Has this trend spread to other countries?

Direct link Reply with quote
 

patyjs  Identity Verified
Mexico
Local time: 22:08
Spanish to English
+ ...
I used to teach in Mexico... Sep 7, 2010

Here, I think the only schools that teach cursive are Montessori. In England, where I grew up (many years ago) we were taught cursive in primary but then we never used it after that. Shame.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Annamaria Amik  Identity Verified
Local time: 06:08
Romanian to English
+ ...
Not sure, but... Sep 7, 2010

Jeff Whittaker wrote:

Schools in the U.S. are no longer teaching cursive or script handwriting. Has this trend spread to other countries?


Not sure, but when I was a little girl (in Romania, where we were taught preeeeetty-preeeetty cursive writing, actually the only form of writing, as far as I remember), it seemed to me that foreigners (i.e. Western Europeans) could only form print-script letters. It was cute


Direct link Reply with quote
 

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 23:08
Member (2002)
French to English
+ ...

MODERATOR
I never gave this a moment's thought Sep 7, 2010

I simply assumed cursive was taught everywhere, as a matter of course, as it is taught here. They start with printing through JK and SK (junior and senior kindergarten, or maternelle-jardin) then in Grade I they turn to cursive.

Direct link Reply with quote
 

Marie-Hélène Hayles  Identity Verified
Local time: 05:08
Italian to English
+ ...
You didn't use joined up writing at secondary school? Sep 7, 2010

patyjs wrote:

Here, I think the only schools that teach cursive are Montessori. In England, where I grew up (many years ago) we were taught cursive in primary but then we never used it after that. Shame.


Seems bizarre to me - surely you'd use joined up writing as a matter of course, once you'd been taught it?

[Edited at 2010-09-07 17:13 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:08
Member (2002)
English to Hungarian
+ ...
But they are teaching it... Sep 7, 2010

Jeff Whittaker wrote:

Schools in the U.S. are no longer teaching cursive or script handwriting.


Jeff, where does this information come from?
At my son's school, they definitely teach cursive handwriting.
They learned the lower case letters last year (2nd grade) and will continue with upper case this year, in 3rd grade.

Katalin


Direct link Reply with quote
 

LegalTransform  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 23:08
Member (2002)
Spanish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
It depends on where you live (for now) Sep 7, 2010

http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2009-01-23-cursive-handwriting_N.htm

http://www.examiner.com/parenting-in-tampa-bay/back-to-school-101-what-happened-to-cursive


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Neil Coffey  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:08
French to English
+ ...
Great educational priorities... Sep 7, 2010

Katalin Horvath McClure wrote:
At my son's school, they definitely teach cursive handwriting.


Great -- next time your son has to use a quill, that'll sure come in handy...


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Madeleine MacRae Klintebo  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:08
Swedish to English
+ ...
Not if your handwriting is anything like mine Sep 7, 2010

Marie-Hélène Hayles wrote:

Seems bizarre to me - surely you'd use joined up writing as a matter of course, once you'd been taught it?


The general idea in Sweden used to be that those like my sister who started school in the late 50s learnt proper joined-up writing, those who started school in the early 60s (me) learnt to use print/block letters whilst simultaneously adding connecting strokes and my brother's generation (late 60s) were taught to write with print/block AND THEN add strokes...

Anyway, it looks like joined-up writing is alive either in England or Sweden today. My son - reception and year 1 in the UK, 4 years in Sweden and then back to the UK from year 6 - writes neater, both joined-up and print/block, than I do.

BTW - what do they do in Italy? Almost all my Italian friends - 30-50 years - have very beautiful handwriting.


Direct link Reply with quote
 
bookwormkt
Local time: 04:08
French to English
+ ...
Here in UK they teach cursive writing Sep 7, 2010

or 'joined up writing' as the children call it!

Some teachers had to teach themselves the preferred style (not too many loops etc) from books or older colleagues, as formal teaching of cursive had not happened for some years!

I used to have a neat, legible, not too 'loopy' cursive handwriting, but these days I use the computer too much!

For dyslexic pupils, using cursive helps to remember spellings, as the correct letters in the right order enters the kinetic memory.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Ivan Patti  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 05:08
English to Italian
+ ...
Cursive is a must Sep 7, 2010

Madeleine MacRae Klintebo wrote:
BTW - what do they do in Italy? Almost all my Italian friends - 30-50 years - have very beautiful handwriting.


Dear Madeleine,

when I started primary school in 1981 I was just unable to write anything, not even my own name, just like most of my contemporaries - printed handwriting not being taught in nursery school (except for some private nursery schools where printed was taught to some very basic extent).

We were taught both cursive and printed handwriting, but cursive was the mostly used: pupils were not allowed to do their homework in printed handwriting and during class time you always had to write in cursive. This went on till the end of high school, and even written examinations at university had to be in cursive.

I don't know what's going on these days, but I don't think anything changed.

Ivan


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jande  Identity Verified
Australia
Local time: 15:08
Danish to English
+ ...
Modern cursive Sep 8, 2010

Here they teach their very own Queensland font! Its a kind of slanted font and the os, ps, bs etc are not round but oval and a bit slanted over. Queensland modern cursive can be seen in the link below:

http://www.chancellorsc.eq.edu.au/LITERACY/Handwriting/HANDWRITING_OVERVIEW.pdf

You can see it is not really different to the non joined writing.

In the 80s I learnt 'running writing', or modern cursive. It was a way of writing so you don't need to take your hand off the page, but it is much clearer and the letters are more well formed than in previous versions of cursive. I never really used it other than when it was compulsory for assignments. Rather touch typing was taught to everyone.

See appendix three in the link below for some SA cursive styles:
http://www.sacsa.sa.edu.au/ATT/{21AB4BA7-0C50-4F6E-9600-2F699503E1E2}/7HSACAppendix.pdf

Here is a link to new American cursive:

http://www.newamericancursive.com/alphabet/

I find it difficult to read many versions cursive writing. Words end up looking like a line of mmms or wwws.

I believe 'modern cursive' is not used much, because in its current form it is no faster than print. Most people I know in the parents age group can't read cursive writing made up of joined letters that are faster to write than non-joined. So it either can't be read or it is no longer quicker than other types of writing.


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Arianne Farah  Identity Verified
Canada
Local time: 23:08
Member (2008)
English to French
Canada in the 80s Sep 8, 2010

I learned script right off the bat in Grade 1. I never learned how to print and just picked it up through reading - it's SO SLOW and inefficient! You have to lift your pen (pencil) so many times when you print! Obviously for reading in books, print is easier because it's clearer, but I even remember books that were printed in script (I'm thinking specifically of the Babar [the elephant] books).

Same as the others below, we HAD to use script in school, you simply couldn't hand in work done in print.

As for styles, I have two - the round, easy to read "bubble" script and the ultra-fast "doctor's prescription" script that only I can read and even then with difficulty but I can write it fast enough that I can take dictation without needing shorthand (you'd be amazed at what they teach in a girl's catholic school - shorthand! in the early 90s! like anyone used that anymore or they were preparing us for secretarial work rather than university, but I disgress).


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Michael Barnett
Local time: 23:08
English
+ ...
Surely you jest! Sep 8, 2010

It is hard to imagine cursive script no longer being taught.

As an elementary student I was delighted and excited to learn cursive writing and was particularly fascinated by cursive letters that were unexpected, such as the capital Q that looked like a 2!

But even capital Q could not compare to the amazing cursive form in Hebrew, which is a misnomer because it isn't even cursive, but in which practically every letter is completely different from its block form! It took me months to get that pe sofit just right. What a beautiful letter!

I didn't get joy again like that until I was a mathematics/physics student at university, trying to master that Greek cursive Xi....

Michael


Direct link Reply with quote
 

Jack Doughty  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:08
Member (2000)
Russian to English
+ ...
Copperplate and Italic Sep 8, 2010

When I learned cursive handwriting (from about 1938), the style taught in UK schools was "copperplate" - see http://www.scribblers.biz/blog/tag/copperplate/page/2/ for example.
From somewhere about 1960 the style taught became "italic" - see http://www.drawyourworld.com/dnealian.html for example.
Though people's handwriting differs widely between individuals, it is still possible to judge the writer's from which of these two styles forms the basis of the handwriting.

[Edited at 2010-09-08 09:24 GMT]


Direct link Reply with quote
 
Pages in topic:   [1 2] >


To report site rules violations or get help, contact a site moderator:

Moderator(s) of this forum
Fernanda Rocha[Call to this topic]

You can also contact site staff by submitting a support request »

Cursive writing no longer taught in schools

Advanced search






Déjà Vu X3
Try it, Love it

Find out why Déjà Vu is today the most flexible, customizable and user-friendly tool on the market. See the brand new features in action: *Completely redesigned user interface *Live Preview *Inline spell checking *Inline

More info »
memoQ translator pro
Kilgray's memoQ is the world's fastest developing integrated localization & translation environment rendering you more productive and efficient.

With our advanced file filters, unlimited language and advanced file support, memoQ translator pro has been designed for translators and reviewers who work on their own, with other translators or in team-based translation projects.

More info »



Forums
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search