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Punctuation

English translation: yes it is

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12:41 Nov 7, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Punctuation
Client has sent me an email with this question and I want to be sure I give him the right answer.

Sentence ends with a list b/t ( )

(cinema, bars, workshops, etc,.).

I think he can get rid of the comma but is it correct to have a period after etc and then another one outside the ) in order to close off the whole sentence like this:

cinemas, bars, workshops, etc.).

?
mbc
Spain
Local time: 21:12
English translation:yes it is
Explanation:
Mike :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2003-11-07 12:46:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The first peroid is because et cetera is an abbreviation. See Random House:

et cet·er·a (et setÆÃr Ã, seÆtrÃ), adv.
and others; and so forth; and so on (used to indicate that more of the same sort or class might have been mentioned, but for brevity have been omitted): He had dogs, cats, guinea pigs, frogs, et cetera, as pets. Abbr.: etc.
[1100–50; late OE < L]
—Usage.ET CETERA, a Latin phrase, appears in English writing most frequently in its abbreviated form, ETC. This phrase is used frequently in technical and business writing, somewhat less frequently in general informal writing, and sometimes in literary or formal writing. Expressions such as and so forth and and so on are useful substitutes. Because “and” is included in the meaning of ET CETERA, the expression and et cetera is redundant.

The second period, the one outside the parenatheses, is because it is used at the end of the sentence.

Mike :)
Selected response from:

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 15:12
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +19yes it is
Michael Powers (PhD)
4 +12Yes, that's correctxxxIanW


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +12
punctuation
Yes, that's correct


Explanation:
Yes, that's correct if the whole sentence isn't in bracket. Example:

"I bought some food (cakes, chocolate, etc.)."

xxxIanW
Local time: 21:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 235

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
6 mins

agree  ntext
28 mins

agree  RHELLER: absolutely!
44 mins
  -> Hey Rita!

agree  AngieD
1 hr

agree  DGK T-I
3 hrs

agree  Refugio
3 hrs

agree  chopra_2002
3 hrs

agree  Sally van der Graaff
4 hrs

agree  Margarita
9 hrs

agree  esma: that`s right
11 hrs

agree  melayujati
13 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
1 day4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +19
punctuation
yes it is


Explanation:
Mike :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2003-11-07 12:46:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The first peroid is because et cetera is an abbreviation. See Random House:

et cet·er·a (et setÆÃr Ã, seÆtrÃ), adv.
and others; and so forth; and so on (used to indicate that more of the same sort or class might have been mentioned, but for brevity have been omitted): He had dogs, cats, guinea pigs, frogs, et cetera, as pets. Abbr.: etc.
[1100–50; late OE < L]
—Usage.ET CETERA, a Latin phrase, appears in English writing most frequently in its abbreviated form, ETC. This phrase is used frequently in technical and business writing, somewhat less frequently in general informal writing, and sometimes in literary or formal writing. Expressions such as and so forth and and so on are useful substitutes. Because “and” is included in the meaning of ET CETERA, the expression and et cetera is redundant.

The second period, the one outside the parenatheses, is because it is used at the end of the sentence.

Mike :)

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 15:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1174
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anna Bittner
1 min
  -> thank you, Anna - Mike :)

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
7 mins
  -> thank you, Svetozar - Mike :)

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro
14 mins
  -> thank you, Paula - Mike :)

agree  ntext
28 mins
  -> thank you, Norbert - Mike :)

agree  jerrie
44 mins
  -> thank you, jerrie - Mike :)

agree  RHELLER: tough one - you both got it at the same time :-)
45 mins
  -> thank you, Riga - Mike :)

agree  cologne
47 mins
  -> thank you,

agree  Louise Mawbey
1 hr
  -> thank you, Louise - Mike :)

agree  AngieD
1 hr
  -> thank you, Angie - Mike :)

agree  vixen
2 hrs
  -> thank you, vixen - Mike :)

agree  ZAMOLXIS
2 hrs
  -> thank you, Zamolxis - Mike :)

agree  DGK T-I: yes, correct - as Michael says (although if it hadn't been there,I wouldn't say that was necessarily incorrect either,nowadays)
3 hrs
  -> thank you, Dr. Giuli - Mike :)

agree  chopra_2002
3 hrs
  -> thank you, langclinic - Mike :)

agree  Sally van der Graaff
4 hrs
  -> thank you, Sally - Mike :)

agree  Jackie Bowman: Correct, but avoid it. More common in semi-decent Spanish than in semi-decent English. I'd prefer "and so on" or equivalent.
5 hrs

neutral  kendra46: Umm.. I'm going with both agree and disagree, because etc. has a period but the period after the ) is not needed in my opinion.The bracket ends the sentence as long as there was punctuation before the first bracket.
5 hrs

agree  Margarita
9 hrs

agree  Fuad Yahya
16 hrs

agree  Jörgen Slet
1 day4 hrs

agree  Ivana UK: agree with Jack, best avoided although grammatically correct
1 day10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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