Professeur *attaché* à l'Ecole de...

English translation: (Guest) Lecturer or Professor at

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
French term or phrase:Professeur *attaché* à l'Ecole de...
English translation:(Guest) Lecturer or Professor at
Entered by: Jocelyne S

10:16 Aug 7, 2008
French to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / Job Title
French term or phrase: Professeur *attaché* à l'Ecole de...
On a CV: "Professeur *attaché* à l'Ecole de ..."

I'm not sure whether this is a "part-time" or "associate" professor (or something else).

If it's "part-time" can someone suggest a classier way of saying it in a university context?

Thanks in advance,
Jocelyne
Jocelyne S
France
Local time: 18:17
Professor at / from ...
Explanation:
Professor at the University of ... OR a professor from the University of ... When I see "attaché", I see the professor as
one who is fit to be tied ... LOL
Selected response from:

Jean-Claude Gouin
Canada
Local time: 12:17
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all who helped out on this question. I gave my client several options and we decided to go with Professor in the end. I have also added "Guest" in brackets to the glossary entry.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4Guest lecturer at...
translatol
3 +3Professor at / from ...
Jean-Claude Gouin
3 +3adjunct
marca
4 +1posh ways of saying part-time in a university: fractional, guest, visiting
Melissa McMahon
4working at
saraja
3Sessional instructor
Diane Partenio (X)
4 -1Associate Professor
Drmanu49
3 -1Assistant professor
mimi 254
Summary of reference entries provided
Rachel Fell

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Professor at / from ...


Explanation:
Professor at the University of ... OR a professor from the University of ... When I see "attaché", I see the professor as
one who is fit to be tied ... LOL

Jean-Claude Gouin
Canada
Local time: 12:17
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all who helped out on this question. I gave my client several options and we decided to go with Professor in the end. I have also added "Guest" in brackets to the glossary entry.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sébastien Ricciardi
2 mins
  -> Merci Sébastien ...

neutral  Drmanu49: This could mean full time which is not the case.
7 mins
  -> Merci Emmanuel de prendre le temps pour donner votre opinion ...

agree  B D Finch: We don't know that it isn't full-time, but if not then the simple addition of "part-time" would solve it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_rank#France
20 mins
  -> Thank you Ms. Finch for your fine suggestion. Full time or part time, s/he is still at the employ of the university in question ... No?

agree  writeaway: why over translate? This is a wysiwyg translation of the Fr (what you see is what you get) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WYSIWYG
35 mins
  -> Thank you for agreeing with me, writeaway ...

agree  Helen Shiner: This would be my solution. Professors may be 'attached' to several institutions at the same time but do not generally feel the need to declare the terms of their appointments in their titles. It is sometimes hard to find out just where they are based!
39 mins
  -> Thank you Helen. S/he may be working part of the time in an industry related to his teaching field ...

disagree  cchat: See the notes by JS and by translatol. In this context, I think professor is a 'faux-ami'.
3 hrs
  -> Merci pour votre opinion ...
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Assistant professor


Explanation:
/

mimi 254
Local time: 18:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 53

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sébastien Ricciardi: Assistant professor (professeur assistant(e)) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_rank_in_France
31 mins
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Associate Professor


Explanation:
... Pellegrini, Assistant professor, LaBRI Perronnin Florence, Perronnin, Associate Professor Perruquetti Wilfrid, Perruquetti, Professor, École Centrale de ...
ralyx.inria.fr/2007/staff-list.txt?category=Enseignant&theme=NUM - 38k -

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2008-08-07 10:37:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Arnaud Tonnelé - Professeur attaché à Grenoble Ecole de Management. Négociations et aspects multiculturels, Marie-France Derderian - Responsable pédagogique ...
www.grenoble-em.com/default.aspx?rub=756 - 36k

Drmanu49
France
Local time: 18:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 316

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Sébastien Ricciardi: Associate Professor is a level of qualification. Edit : Associate, not assistant, true, my apologies
11 mins
  -> Your disagree is wrong, I am an "associate professor" not "assistant" with two UFR.

neutral  B D Finch: Associate professor is a professeur associé, which is something else.
37 mins

neutral  Jim Tucker (X): Associate professor is a rank in the US, and indicates that the person in question has tenure.
2 hrs
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
adjunct


Explanation:
I'm not sure if this term is appropriate in your context, but it's a quite common US term for anyone who teaches courses but is not otherwise attached to the institution.

marca
United States
Local time: 12:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Melissa McMahon: I like this - also common outside of US, and avoids ambiguities of 'associate"
6 mins

agree  Jean-Louis S.: Correct!
26 mins

agree  translatol: I like adjunct too, although I've given another answer. But I haven't seen it used in Europe.
1 day 8 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
posh ways of saying part-time in a university: fractional, guest, visiting


Explanation:
I like "adjunct", but above are suggestions for posh ways of saying part-time: the professorship may be 'fractional' and if the position is short term, the person may be a "visiting" or "guest" professor.

Nb. it is essential the target audience is US for the term 'professor' be appropriate here. "Lecturer" would be the generic non-US equivalent.

Melissa McMahon
Australia
Local time: 04:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 56

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rachel Fell: visiting professor, I suggest - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visiting_professor
20 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Guest lecturer at...


Explanation:
This title is very elegant, and is the English term used by the Geneva École de Management for its 'intervenants extérieurs'.

Professeur/professor runs the risk of being a 'faux ami', because 'professor' is a high-ranking title in Anglo-Saxon universities, whereas 'professeur' is of much more general application in French.


    Reference: http://www.grenoble-em.com/271-human-resources-2.aspx
translatol
Local time: 17:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cchat: Definitely the best solution so far, as being most likely to fit JS's context note. But I presume you mean Grenoble and not Geneva, from your reference ;-).
21 mins
  -> Many thanks, cchat, and yes I did mean G....

agree  liz askew
56 mins
  -> Thank you, liz

agree  Terry Gwenn
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, kobay.

agree  Aude Sylvain
5 hrs
  -> Merci, Aude.

neutral  Helen Shiner: I would be careful here. It is possible to be invited to give one lecture in the UK and be termed a guest lecturer at a particularly university. Please see my comments on 1045's answer./Exactly. I'm sure the asker will sort this out.
9 hrs
  -> Yes, I can see this. It's a hard one because of differing academic terminologies. You do really have to know the readership: see, for example, Diane's Canadian answer.

neutral  Melissa McMahon: I think I already offered this option, and explained the 'professor' problem?
19 hrs
  -> Yes, it *is* in your answer but along with other things, so I tried to specify. In N. America, 'professor' is the popular word for all university teachers, but formally it's one of the academic ranks rising from assistant professor to full professor.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Sessional instructor


Explanation:
I'm not sure who the target readership is but in Canada, this is the term that is used for a professor without tenure (alas, a growing percentage of university faculty in this country...) which I think is what we're talking about here.

Definition from Answers.com entry on "professor", which you may find useful..

Sessional instructor

A sessional instructor is a person, usually a Ph.D.-holder, who is hired to teach at a university or college on a limited contract, often for a single term. Considerable controversy surrounds the practice of hiring sessionals, since they are increasingly making up a large proportion of instructors at North American universities, where they earn considerably less than other instructors and have no job security.


    Reference: http://www.answers.com/topic/professor
Diane Partenio (X)
Canada
Local time: 12:17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  translatol: I thought of this for Canada. Actually, at the U of Ottawa we called them 'sessional lecturers'. But I'm not sure it would be understood in Europe, nor that it's quite what is meant here.
3 hrs
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
working at


Explanation:
affecté à/travaillant à

Example sentence(s):
  • Je ne crois pas qu'il s'agit de "part-time"
saraja
Mauritius
Local time: 21:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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