KudoZ home » English » Idioms / Maxims / Sayings

to bring a bust

English translation: sculputured representation

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:to bring a bust
English translation:sculputured representation
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:03 Feb 19, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
English term or phrase: to bring a bust
Context is this:
"Few read Schelling today, and even fewer find him cogent. One cannot imagine anyone nowadays BRINGING A BUST of Schelling to Russia (or anywhere else for that matter), but that is what Ivan Kireyevsky did. Schelling was lionized and idolized in Russia in a way that is hard to understand now."

I don't think I should take it literally. Is this a idiomatic expression?
By the way, Schelling is a german thinker from the nineteenth century.

TIA
MLeiria
Portugal
Local time: 03:19
a sculputured representation
Explanation:
Merriam-Webster
Main Entry: 1bust
Pronunciation: 'b&st
Function: noun
Etymology: French buste, from Italian busto, from Latin bustum tomb
1 : a sculptured representation of the upper part of the human figure including the head and neck and usually part of the shoulders and breast
2 : the upper part of the human torso between neck and waist; especially : the breasts of a woman
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 21:19
Grading comment
thank you, Kim, sundari and everyone else.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +13a sculputured representation
Kim Metzger
3 -2idolize, worship
Stefanie Sendelbach


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +13
a sculputured representation


Explanation:
Merriam-Webster
Main Entry: 1bust
Pronunciation: 'b&st
Function: noun
Etymology: French buste, from Italian busto, from Latin bustum tomb
1 : a sculptured representation of the upper part of the human figure including the head and neck and usually part of the shoulders and breast
2 : the upper part of the human torso between neck and waist; especially : the breasts of a woman

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 21:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 55
Grading comment
thank you, Kim, sundari and everyone else.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: bust = sculputure of head, neck and shoulders (Beethoven is a common one)
1 min

agree  Jonathan MacKerron: OED =A piece of sculpture representing the head, shoulders, and breast of a person
1 min

agree  Mikhail Kropotov
8 mins

agree  GoodWords
8 mins

agree  paolamonaco: no doubt. No idiomatic expression here!
8 mins

agree  JCEC
9 mins

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
19 mins

agree  Alex Lane: If you have ever read the comic strip "Peanuts," the piano-playing character (Linus) often is shown with a bust of Beethoven on his piano. Busts are often displayed for inspirational purposes.
38 mins

agree  Derek Gill Franßen
39 mins

agree  KLS: absolutely correct, the literal meaning is intended.
57 mins

agree  LILIANA HUTANU
2 hrs

agree  Refugio: literal
3 hrs

agree  Alp Berker
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -2
idolize, worship


Explanation:
I also think this is not to be taken literally here. My understanding is that "to idolize" or "to worship" him is what is meant here.

Stefanie Sendelbach
Germany
Local time: 04:19
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  RHELLER: sorry but that would be re-writing the text here
3 mins

neutral  GoodWords: Agree with Rita. The wording does not support a non-literal interpretation.
6 mins

disagree  Refugio: no reason to assume it doesn't mean exactly what it says
3 hrs

disagree  Tony M: As Ruth, Rita and G/W have said --- the literal meaning is fine here.
7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search