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tuppance

English translation: tuppence, British currency

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:tuppance
English translation:tuppence, British currency
Entered by: RHELLER
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03:43 May 21, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
/ curancey
English term or phrase: tuppance
money, penny, small amount
melinda
tuppence, British currency
Explanation:
Britain adopted a decimal currency system (100 pence = 1 pound) in 1967 ... 2 d. $, .04,
twopence; "tuppence", silver, 1817-1820, afterwards only collector's proofs and ...

$ .04 twopence;
"tuppence" silver 1817-1820


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Note added at 2003-05-21 03:51:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There was no coin for 2d, but you would say that something cost tuppence (as in Mary Poppins, both for seed to \"feed the birds\", and for \"paper and string\" for kites). You would pay for it with two pennies (rather than pence).

http://www.gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/units/money.htm
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 22:28
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +22tuppence, British currencyRHELLER
4 +4twopence
Kim Metzger


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +22
tuppence, British currency


Explanation:
Britain adopted a decimal currency system (100 pence = 1 pound) in 1967 ... 2 d. $, .04,
twopence; "tuppence", silver, 1817-1820, afterwards only collector's proofs and ...

$ .04 twopence;
"tuppence" silver 1817-1820


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 03:51:26 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

There was no coin for 2d, but you would say that something cost tuppence (as in Mary Poppins, both for seed to \"feed the birds\", and for \"paper and string\" for kites). You would pay for it with two pennies (rather than pence).

http://www.gwydir.demon.co.uk/jo/units/money.htm


    Reference: http://www.cyberussr.com/hcunn/gold-bri.html
RHELLER
United States
Local time: 22:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1252
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger
1 min

agree  xxxIno66
38 mins

agree  PCovs: Let's go fly a kite!
1 hr

agree  EdithK
1 hr

agree  Tanja Abramovic
1 hr

agree  john mason
1 hr

agree  Marie Scarano
1 hr

agree  Steffen Walter
2 hrs

agree  Attila Piróth
2 hrs

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
2 hrs

agree  Sarah Ponting: Up to the highest heights!
3 hrs

agree  jerrie: 2 old pennies - we now have a 2 pence piece!
3 hrs

agree  J. Leo
4 hrs

agree  vixen
4 hrs

agree  xxxasusisu: rather have "half a sixpence"
4 hrs
  -> thanks to all!

agree  Magdalena_
4 hrs
  -> merci

agree  Spiros Doikas
9 hrs

agree  jccantrell
10 hrs

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith
11 hrs

agree  Bin Zhang
13 hrs

agree  T Crotogino
15 hrs

agree  DGK T-I
1 day17 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
twopence


Explanation:
The word is spelled tuppence and it was a British coin worth two pennies. The coin is no longer used in the UK since decemilisation in 1971.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-21 04:00:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I stand corrected. As Rita says, there was no coin for two pennies.


    Concise Oxford
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 23:28
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tanja Abramovic
1 hr

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
2 hrs

agree  airmailrpl
9 hrs

agree  DGK T-I: along with ha'penny (half old penny/d), threpenny bit (three old d coin),& farthing (quarter old/d coin)!
1 day18 hrs
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