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para dejar entrar la luz del sol

English translation: to let the sunshine in

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21:45 Nov 6, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Spanish term or phrase: para dejar entrar la luz del sol
La ventana del patio de la mansión del juez se abrió para dejar entrar la luz del sol.
xxxUNISON
English translation:to let the sunshine in
Explanation:
Hope that helps!

Rufino
Selected response from:

Rufino Pérez De La Sierra
Canada
Local time: 09:52
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your answer.

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +11Let the sunglight in...cebice
5 +7to let the sunshine in
Rufino Pérez De La Sierra
5 +4to let in the light of day
William Stein
5 +3para dejar entrar la luz del sol = to invite the sunshine into the room.Ana-Maria Hulse
5 +3Sir Winston Churchill used a preposition at the end of a sentence...xxxdawn39
5 +3to LET in the sunlight.Jane Lamb-Ruiz
5 +2to let the sunshine inJeanne Zang
5 +1"to let the sunshine / sunlight in". Both of them are rightxxxdawn39
3 +1and let the sunshine in
verbis


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
to let the sunshine in


Explanation:
Hope that helps!

Rufino

Rufino Pérez De La Sierra
Canada
Local time: 09:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 214
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jeanne Zang: I'm always about 10 seconds to late!!
1 min

agree  Hermann
1 min

agree  Alicia Jordá
4 mins

agree  Nitza Ramos
6 mins

agree  David Russi
1 hr

disagree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: no because it's poor style to end a sentence with a preposition in English
2 hrs

agree  Esther Hermida
3 hrs

agree  xxxdawn39: no doubt and very, very good style, Rufino. Buen día :))
11 hrs

agree  Nora Escoms
16 hrs
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to let the sunshine in


Explanation:
personal knowledge

Jeanne Zang
United States
Local time: 08:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 43

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Hermann
0 min
  -> thanks

agree  xxxdawn39: personal knowledge, as well :))
11 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
Let the sunglight in...


Explanation:

The patio window in the Judge's mansion was opened to let the sunglight in...

cebice
United States
Local time: 07:52
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 143

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Hermann: sun(g)light
1 min

agree  Jeanne Zang: sunlight, of course. I think either that or sunshine is fine.
2 mins
  -> Sorry, that was a typo!

agree  Refugio: This is the one; but sunlight not sunglight
3 mins

agree  Nikki Graham: yes, sunlight, not sunshine
4 mins

agree  xxxcmwilliams: sunlight
9 mins

agree  Carolingua: I like sunlight better than sunshine. The other phrase "let the sunshine in" always makes me think of Hair (the musical).
20 mins

agree  Deborah Ramirez
35 mins

agree  colemh
38 mins

agree  Aurélie DANIEL
47 mins

agree  Robert Anderson: Definitely sunlight if it comes through a window.
56 mins

agree  Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
1 hr

agree  Susana Galilea
1 hr

disagree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: let in the sunlight NOT let the sunlgiht in
2 hrs

neutral  Maria-Jose Pastor: sunlight yes, but also agree w/Jane.
2 hrs

agree  xxxdawn39: I understand you meant "sunlight" and I also understand Jane´s "sunlgiht". Buen día :))
11 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
to let in the light of day


Explanation:
Another option

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-06 22:07:38 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here are some bizarre references for you:

The Coming of the Ninth Moon ReMix
... [break 1] Fingers touch Essence of Stardust Let in the Cosmic Ray let in the Light of day Let in the Light of Day Let in the Light of Day! ...
www.tweakheadz.com/jukebox/ coming_of_the_ninth_moon_remix.htm - 11k - Cached - Similar pages

The Clever Monkey and the Boar ... It seemed to him a very long time before his master\'s wife began to move about and open the shutters to let in the light of day. ...
www.geocities.co.jp/HeartLand-Gaien/7211/monkey.html - 8k - Cached - Similar pages

A Day in the Life of PFC Charles Carreon, Nine Years Old, by ...
... In the washroom there were seven sinks, a length of mirror, five toilets and two windows that let in the light of day. Charles took a sink next to the window. ...
www.american-buddha.com/day.in.life.htm


William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 06:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1214

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MLG: Yes! the light of day.
2 hrs

agree  brendaskye
6 hrs

agree  xxxdawn39: and a very good one. Have a nice day, William :)
11 hrs

neutral  Belmis: Well. Es la luz del sol no la luz del día.
22 hrs
  -> De dónde viene la luz del día sino del sol?

agree  Clara Fuentes
3 days25 mins
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54 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
and let the sunshine in


Explanation:
that's how I see it...





hth

verbis
Local time: 14:52
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 112

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: let in the sunshine is better English
1 hr
  -> not according to UK standards............

agree  xxxdawn39: very good English, indeed! Have a nice day :))
11 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
to LET in the sunlight.


Explanation:
One tries to not end a sentence with a prepostion.

STYLE

to let in sunlight

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-07 00:03:40 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I know it may annoy some people, but that\'s the way it is.

native speaker oblige, in this case...:)

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 7709

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria-Jose Pastor: Bravo!
19 mins
  -> People have great resistance to rational argument. Thanx for your comment.

agree  xxxdawn39: this is only one way, not the only one. "Try not to end a sentence..." sounds better.You try,but ...some of us do not. Jane, "native speaker oblige", but you can also be wrong (= sunlgiht). Everybody can be wrong .Be sure:I am not annoyed :)
10 hrs
  -> This is 101 level English writing. No doubt about how this sounds. Sorry....you can think what you like. It would be better to learn more though right? Ask ANY English major. he or she will tell you..my quibble is not with shine or light

neutral  verbis: not according to good UK standards..............
23 hrs

agree  Cecilia Della Croce: I prefer sunshine, though
23 hrs
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
para dejar entrar la luz del sol = to invite the sunshine into the room.


Explanation:
Because this is literature, one has to choose the form that goes better with the style of the rest of the piece. In other words, one can take small liberties, and I believe "inviting" the sunshine into the room sounds ok. Just my humble opinion. Hope it helps.

Ana-Maria Hulse
United States
Local time: 05:52
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 61

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxdawn39: una opción maravillosa y llena de poesía. Buen día, Ana María :)
3 hrs

agree  verbis
16 hrs

agree  Cecilia Della Croce: Me gusta mucho tu opción por lo poética; me parece que está muy buena para una traducción literaria
16 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"to let the sunshine / sunlight in". Both of them are right


Explanation:
En español pasa lo mismo.
Hay dos formas de expresar la misma idea:

"Deja que entre el sol" (=sunshine)
"Deja que entre la luz del sol" (=sunlight)
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
Thousands of good references.

Very good English and "very English" a preposition at the end of a sentence.

"... The front of the top quickly flips **open to let the sunshine in**".

www.ppcpoint.com/adeijknorstuw.asp
¨¨¨¨... NWSTC is sometimes forgotten in the summer months because we are an indoor center.
But the bay doors are always open to let the sunshine in when it's nice out. ...
www.polevault.com/community/messages/989.html
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
... on the door when I don't answer, and peering suspiciously through my window if I
have been incautious enough to leave the drapes **open to let the sunshine in**? ...
www.salvoblue.homestead.com/dropin.html
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
"... Insulate! Insulate! Insulate! Let the sun shine in. Keep drapes and shades on
south windows open during the day in the winter ¨**to let the sunlight in**".

www.state.ma.us/doer/pub_info/press/oct-02.htm
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
"... out as something ambitious in corrugated iron on overlapping planks with a 2 inch
by 4 inch frame and maybe a transparent roof section **to let the sunlight in*".

www.underdog-online.com/index.php/ article/articleview/106/1/10/
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
And now... the famous song

LET THE SUNSHINE IN (From "Hair")

We Starve-look at one another short of breath
Walking proudly in our winter coats
Wearing smells from laboartories

Facing a dying nation of moving papaer fantasy
Listening for the new told lies
With supreme visions of lonly tunes

Sining our space songs on a spider web sitarLife is around you and in you
Answer from Timothy Leary deary

Let the sunshine
Let the sunshine in
The sunshine in

Let the sunshineLet the sunshine in
The sunshine in

Let the sunshine
Let the sunshine in
The sunshine in
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
Cheers!


xxxdawn39
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 209

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nora Escoms
4 hrs
  -> thanks a lot, Nora. Have a nice week-end :)

neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: Let the sunshine in is 1) a song 2) the preposition at the end IN WRITING sounds bad to ear 3) Let in is more elegant and there is no equivalency here. ASK ANY WRITER. Why are you so resistant to learning something??
4 hrs
  -> thanks, Jane... Have a nice day :)
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20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Sir Winston Churchill used a preposition at the end of a sentence...


Explanation:
UNISON, please, let me give some references about the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence.
Thanks a lot.
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
"Will I be Arrested if I End a Sentence with a Preposition?"

- A Southerner stopped a stranger on the Harvard campus and asked, "Could you please tell me where the library is at?" The stranger responded, "Educated people never end their sentences with a preposition." The overly polite Southerner then apologetically repeated himself: "Could you please tell me where the library is at, you jerk?"
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
While editing the proof of one of his books, **Sir Winston Churchill** spotted a sentence that had been clumsily rewritten by the editor to eliminate a preposition at the end. The elder statesman mocked the intention with a comment in the margin: "This is the sort of English up with which I will not put."

These two anecdotes reflect an intolerance on both sides of the Atlantic for the rule prohibiting sentence-final prepositions. So where did the rule come from, anyway?

Before the science of language, linguistics, schools and universities taught what is known as 'prescriptive grammar'. Prescriptive grammar is not grammar (the rules of spoken language) at all but a list of "do's and don'ts" prescribing the way those in or striving for the upper class should talk. Because all upper-class private schools of the time emphasized, if not required Latin, 'good' grammar was presumed to be grammar that emulated Latin grammar.

The problem is, English is not Latin, an insight lost on prescriptivists. Latin has cases and every Latin preposition is associated with a case. For example, the word for "wine" in Latin is vinum. However, the prepositional phrase corresponding to "in wine" is in vino (as in 'in vino veritas'; 'wine brings out the truth') ending on the Ablative case marker, -o, because in was associated with the Ablative case. So the suffix of vin-o identifies the noun vin-um as the object of the preposition in and not the object of any other preposition in the sentence; in short, they go together.

Because sentences usually contain several prepositional phrases like this (e.g., "A relative of the fruitfly was doing something like the backstroke in the wine on the table in the library."), it is important to keep up with which noun goes with which preposition. The easiest way to do that is by a rule that prepositions are never separated from their object noun (or noun phrase if the noun is modified by adjectives). Latin has that rule.

Believing that Latin grammar represents grammatical perfection and unintimidated by the onerous task of molding English in the image of Latin, prescriptive grammarians proscribed the use of prepositions anywhere other than immediately before their object noun. For example, one should not say "the prescriptivist John clashed with," but rather "the prescriptivist with whom John clashed", not "the rule John laughed at," but "the rule at which John laughed".

The fact of the matter is, however, English simply does not have case endings on nouns that are objects of prepositions, so the reason for keeping prepositions and their object nouns together is wholly irrelevant to English. You may keep them together or not. You'll never spend a night in jail either way. However, because of the upper-class bias in the rule's history, its use now makes you sound pretentious: "the chap in whom I invested my trust". (Is that you? It isn't me; nor was it Winston Churchill.)

This example teaches us two important lessons about language. First, each and every language has its own set of grammatical rules and everyone who speaks that language knows what they are in his or her region. (They do vary slightly from region to region--big deal.) That is what speech is: the use of grammatical rules to express oneself. Second, prescriptive grammar is based on misconceptions about language and causes far more mischief than good.
==============================
"Using a preposition at the end of a sentence is acceptable according to the usage dictionaries. The consensus seems to be dictated by the writer’s audience rather than adhering to the rules of grammar.

In The Usage and Abusage Guide Dictionary, Eric Partridge states, "The legitimacy of the prepositional ending in literary English must be uncompromisingly maintained; in respect of elegance or inelegance, every example must be judged not by an arbitrary rule, but on its own merits, according to the impression it makes on the feeling of educated English readers" (Partridge 254). In many cases, not using a preposition at the end of a sentence can lead to worse grammatical errors. According to, The Longmans Guide of Usage, the book suggests that writers should avoid the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence in formal writing, if there is an alternative. However, for less formal usage one may end a sentence with a preposition. The New York Public Library Writers Guide to Style and Usage, strongly emphasizes that ending a sentence with a preposition is acceptable. The book recommends that prepositions at the end of a sentence should be used as parts of idiomatic phrases. The New Fowlers Modern English Usage Dictionary confirms that there are many circumstances in which a preposition must be placed at the end of a sentence. In formal writing, one should avoid using a preposition at the end of a sentence. The American Heritage Dictionary defines that there is simply nothing wrong with using a preposition at the end of a sentence.

In conclusion, a few high school and college professors are instructing their students that a sentence should not end with a preposition. However, through the usage dictionaries the grammarians agree that this is not an enforceable rule. Even though it is desirable to avoid using a preposition at the end of a sentence, in many circumstances it is unavoidable. What dictates its usage at the end of a sentence is the effect or emphasizes that the writer desires to portray".
==========================
"Although we cannot communicate without at least some understanding of the rules, we also need to be flexible about their application. It's important to leave room for creativity while maintaining the goal of clear communication.

“Never end a sentence on a preposition.”

When criticized for occasionally ending a sentence on a preposition, Sir Winston Churchill replied, “This is the type of errant pedantry up with which I will not put.” Churchill’s reply satirizes the strict adherence to this rule. No one is urging you to write, “Where is Johnny at?” or “Where are you going to?” The best, most effective communication sounds and feels natural, and if that means writing, “Here is the file the list belongs with” instead of “Here is the file with which the list belongs,” then write it that way".

www.irmi.com/expert/articles/blake005.
asp
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
Some of the "rules" of English grammar that you learned in school were devised by pedants who believed that English was inferior to Latin and should be improved by forcing it onto the Procrustean bed of Latin grammar. But English is descended from an ancestral German dialect, not from Latin, and certain of the rules based on Latin grammar simply do not fit the structure of English.


Often what looks like a preposition in an English sentence is really not a preposition but a part of the verb (the technical term is adverbial particle). Consider these verbs: to put, to put up, to put up with. Obviously these are not the same verbs, and equally obviously the words that look like familiar prepositions are actually a part of each of the latter two verbs.


Do you really want to be so "correct" as to complain, "That is the sort of thing up with which I will not put!" (Winston Churchill once used a similar remark to mock someone who had criticized him for ending a sentence with a preposition.)


Here's another example: There is no need to notify us about problems of which we are already aware.


Doesn't it sound far better to say: There is no need to notify us about problems that we are already aware of.


The following example should really make you shudder: It took some time to discover from where the disease originated.


Don't you prefer this version?: It took some time to discover where the disease originated from.


I just came across this example in a newspaper article this morning:
Officials in Iraq still have not decided with whom he will be allowed to meet.


Now see how this version sounds to you: Officials in Iraq still have not decided whom he will be allowed to meet with.


This next example comes from one of my own articles: A verbal still retains some of the properties of the verb it was derived from. Aren't you glad I didn't write: A verbal still retains some of the properties of the verb from which it was derived? All right--I know some of you actually do wish I had written the sentence that way, but I'm guessing that to most of you, the first version sounds better.


Everyone is so afraid of being corrected, which is to say being embarrassed, that we find absurdities caused by this preposition "rule" not only in writing but in speech--especially in the speech of news reporters and media pundits. The next time you find yourself pronouncing or writing a bizarre, ugly sentence just to avoid that final preposition, consider using the language more naturally.


If you would like to read some comments concerning this issue from some of the most widely acknowledged experts on English grammar and usage, check out my article "Prepositions at the Ends of Sentences:Further Explanation of Why the 'Rule Is Wrong."


But do remember, it's still considered improper in some circumstances to end your sentence with a proposition.*
_________________________________
*No, that's not a typo or a misspelling.

www.grammartips.homestead.com/prepositions1.html
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨
To end with, I must say that elegance does not consist in following some rules, but in respecting others´tastes.











--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-08 02:21:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The Nobel Prize in Literature 1953
\"for his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values\"

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill

United Kingdom

b. 1874
d. 1965

Churchill\'s literary career began with campaign reports: \"The Story of the Malakand Field Force\" (1898) and \"The River War\" (1899), an account of the campaign in the Sudan and the Battle of Omdurman. In 1900, he published his only novel, Savrola, and, six years later, his first major work, the biography of his father, \"Lord Randolph Churchill\". His other famous biography, the life of his great ancestor, the Duke of Marlborough, was published in four volumes between 1933 and 1938. Churchill\'s history of the First World War appeared in four volumes under the title of \"The World Crisis\"(1923-29); his memoirs of the Second World War ran to six volumes (1948-1953/54). After his retirement from office, Churchill wrote a \"History of the English-speaking Peoples\" (4 vols., 1956-58). His magnificent oratory survives in a dozen volumes of speeches, among them \"The Unrelenting Struggle\" (1942), \"The Dawn of Liberation\" (1945), and \"Victory\" (1946).




    Reference: http://www.yourdictionary.com/library/drlang001.html
    www.hfac.uh.edu/English/classes/ GU4322/items/prepositions.html
xxxdawn39
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 209

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  William Stein: That's a point I agree WITH
4 hrs
  -> thanks, William. This is something some people must think ABOUT :)))

agree  verbis
5 hrs
  -> thanks, Verbis. This is something I was looking FOR :)))

agree  Cecilia Della Croce: Thank you for your "enlightening" explanation ;)
5 hrs
  -> thanks, Cecilia. This is something I have heard OF ;)
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